Kiwomya the hero as Chelsea beat Liverpool in FA Youth Cup semi-final first leg

first_imgChelsea’s youngsters will fancy their chances of reaching the FA Youth Cup final after Alex Kiwomya scored late goals to give them a 2-0 victory against Liverpool in the semi-final first leg at Anfield.Kiwomya struck with two minutes remaining and then again in injury time to put his team in a commanding position going into next week’s second leg at Stamford Bridge.He collected the loose ball after skipper Lewis Baker’s shot took a deflection and fired home from 10 yards.And Liverpool were undone again when Jeremie Boga burst across from the left and found Kiwomya, who drilled into the far corner of the net.The game came to life in the second half, with both teams hitting the woodwork before the deadlock was eventually broken.Chelsea full-back Ola Aina saw an effort shave the near post before the Blues went agonisingly close following great work from substitute John Swift.Islam Feruz latched on to Swift’s clever pass and fired against the post, with keeper Ryan Fulton keeping out Ruben Loftus-Cheek’s follow-up.Fulton also saved well to deny Kiwomya and at the other end, Kristoffer Peterson’s shot was pushed on to the post by keeper Mitchell Beeney.It proved to be an important save as the home side then faded and Kimomya showed his potential with a couple of fine finishes.The winners of the tie will face Norwich or Nottingham Forest in the final.See also:Chelsea’s Kiwomya extends loan deal at CreweYTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

The Impact, Profile, and Reputation of South Africa on the African Continent

first_imgEY Africa Attractiveness Survey 2015SA is the top destination for FDI projects – the country attracted 121 projects in 2014/15SA was the favourite destination for Chinese projects, securing 34.4% of total Chinese investment on the African continentNorth Africa rebounds as inflows to Southern Africa falter: Egypt comes second with 71 projects; Morocco comes third with 67 projectsThe above are actual greenfields investments, and does not account for flows in the financial markets – which – if included will show that SA is the top destination for FDI and financial market activity in AfricaContext: Africa’s share of global FDI grew from 3.6% in 2003 to 7,7 in 2012, and the continent more than doubled its share of global FDI flows from 7.8% in 2013 to 17.1% in 2014Global FDI flow indicators on SA: OutboundEY – Africa Attractiveness Survey (2015)South Africa is the second largest source of FDI into the African continent (53 projects launched in 2014).SA is the leading intra-regional investor in the financial services sector (16 projects launched in 2014.Outbound Investment2013 budget speech of then minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, indicated that during the 2008-2013 period the South African Reserve Bank approved nearly 1000 large investments by South African corporations into 36 African countriesNDP underlines critical importance of boosting intra-African trade and integration of regional marketsJohannesburg Stock Exchange currently ranked the 19th largest stock exchange in the world by market capitalisation and the largest exchange in AfricaIndustrial Development Corporation (IDC) has investments in 60 projects across 20 countries that creates a cumulative African investment portfolio of R7.5 billion by March 2014With so many SA and multinational corporates that operate from Joburg into other African markets, the city’s logistical, air, inland port, and related soft infrastructure provides a solid base for corporates to establish regional headquarters.Brand SA Fieldwork ResearchTHE SA INC SERIESRationale:SA’s reputation is shaped by foreign policy; trade interactions as well as a divergent sets of relationships & interests (governmental, non-governmental, and business)Objectives:Development of framework of analysis that considers all elements of SA’s strategic economic, diplomatic, multilateral, and peace & security engagements on the continentIntegrated view of SA’s footprint on the continent for strategic marketing, communications, and reputation management projectsThe SA Inc. Project: FieldworkCycle 1 – 2014/15: Kenya, Nigeria, GhanaCycle 2 – 2015/16: Russia, Angola, DRC, SenegalBrand SA’s Africa strategy: development of SA presence & reputation in select markets/multilateral environmentsSouth Africa In(c) series research reports based on:direct fieldwork studiesdesktop researchSA Inc. Project: Kenya – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Kenya Imports from SA: R 7 778 157 829SA Imports from Kenya: R 214 882 875Total Bilateral Trade: R7 993 040 704SA Inc. Project: Kenya Key FindingsChallenges & opportunities for interaction between the countries:SA’s reputational strengths:SA democratic transition, strong institutionsMajor interest in SA music & cultureSA’s reputational challenges:SA seen as losing competitive edge, & not promoting internal developmentSA character/personality perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA companies losing to local competition due to poor market entry strategies and ‘know it all’ attitudesSA Inc. Project: Nigeria – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Nigeria Imports from SA: R 7 524 647 002SA Imports from Nigeria: R 35 016 713 902Total Bilateral Trade: R 42 541 360 904SA Inc. Project: Nigeria Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA highly visible & respected (more than 150 companies active in market)SA’s democratic transition, institutional & infrastructural profile appreciated & referenced as key attractiveness featureInterest in business & investment interactions as well as cultural, music, tourism & related experiencesSA’s reputational challenges:Despite major business & investment footprint, concerns about SA character & business cultureWith Nigeria’s rebased GDP, SA considered to be losing competitive edgeSA character/business persona can be perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA co’s losing to local competition due to quick adaptation & learning and not woking with local partners in market entry, maintenance & expansion strategiesSA Inc. Project: Ghana– South Africa Bilateral TradeGhana Imports from SA: R 4 102 457 867SA Imports from Ghana: R 175 234 249Total Bilateral Trade: R4 277 692 116SA Inc. Project: Ghana Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA’s corporate governance, managerial, technical, & other expertiseStrong people-to-people relations & potential for expansion in creative spheres, e.g. design, music, visual artsSA corporates & their products & services widely known & utilised in marketGhanaians prefer ‘international brands’, incl. those from SAPotential in building deeper social & cultural relations via music, arts, design and cultural diplomacySA entrepreneurs use Accra as regional base/hub for West African business operationsSA Inc. Project: Angola– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Angola Imports from SA: R 8 034 823 695SA Imports from Angola: R 15 372 088 529Total Bilateral Trade: R23 406 912 224SA Inc. Project: Angola Key FindingsSA and Angola have a ‘bi-polar’ history…Therefore critical that interested parties carefully select expats and South African experts to be deployed in the marketAngolans describe themselves as arrogant, and South Africans are also criticised as being arrogant – need for increased cultural contact and building of mutual understandingUnderstand political & administrative context and “do homework”! Invest adequate resources (time and money) in preparing to enter the marketTake time & invest in relationship-building; identify reliable local partnerRecognise importance of language and (business) culture, e.g. Portuguese South Africans play a constructive role in several SA corporates in the marketLeverage off strong bilateral political relationsApproach Angolan government with ‘what can we do for you’ rather than ‘we are great at this and will bring it to you’SA Inc. Project: DRC– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)DRC imports from SA: R 11 925 581 263SA Imports from DRC: R 1 145 732 485Total Bilateral Trade: R 13 071 313 748SA Inc. Project: DRC Key Findings‘The Congo is open for business!’ – unlike other markets, former colonial power doesn’t enjoy privileges in terms of exploiting business opportunitiesAcknowledge local business culture & need for “courting” – relationship-building is key, both with government and business, if one is reap any rewards from engaging in the market.When entering DRC, SA corporates must take caution not to be perceived as arrogant by expecting host to adapt to their ways of doing businessAgriculture is key competitive strength – SA recognised for its expertise in sector. Given that DRC only utilises ≈10% of its 80m hectares of arable land, there’s enormous potential for SA to play a role hereSouth Africa’s Lieutenant General Derrick Mbuyiselo Mgwebi, Force Commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO)“The Congo is a big country with a relatively small budget and many priorities”Great expectations, ample opportunities and overwhelming prioritiesSA to utilise well-established footprint in DRC to promote SA investmentsOnly one, albeit critical challenge:Political instability and insecurity and continued conflict in the KivusSA Inc. Project: Senegal – South Africa Bilateral TradeSenegal imports from SA: R 1 296 609 007SA Imports from Senegal: R 238 916 730Total Bilateral Trade: R1 535 525 737SA Inc. Project: Senegal Key FindingsAt political, business, art and societal level, Senegal is extremely open to the idea of increased interaction between the countriesRelatively low level of knowledge about South Africa, particularly about the country’s development post-1994;Potential for significant linkages such as the twinning of Goree Island and Robben IslandOpportunity to focus on 30 years since the 1987 meeting on Goree island between the ANC and a delegation of AfrikanersSenegal challenges SA to play more pro-active & leading role in promoting Africa’s developmentExpanded business interaction through increased contact with chambers of commerce, e.g. Dakar Chamber of CommercePotential for expanded agriculture sector interactionsAcademic contact and exchange, esp. Universite Du Sine Saloum Elhadj Ibrahima NiassThe SA Inc. Project: Key Findings 2014The Nation Brand concept & marketing strategy depends on stakeholder interactions, and challenges Brand SA to be open to changing domestic and international environmentsUnique nation brand reputational strengths: culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure, political management of democratic transitionsChallenges: South Africans perceived as imposing, aggressive, and unwilling to listen to local adviceSA business to adopt market entry strategies that pay more attention to soft factors, e.g. local business culturePolitically, SA seen as progressive, with strong institutions, & democratic credentials.Internal developmental challenges cause for concern, e.g. xenophobia, misplaced perceptions about African expats in SA (esp. Kenya & Nigeria)SA music, art & cultural products well-received & followed, with continued interest in expanded interactionThe SA Inc. Project: Russia / BRICS 2015Activities and OutputsFieldwork Russia, July 2015Research Report, The Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, published 30 September 2015Dissemination at Roundtable, 30 September 2015Theme: Deepening the relationship between Brazil, Russia, India, China and South AfricaPanellists:Prof Garth Shelton, University of WitwatersrandMs Catherine Grant-Makokera, Tutwa ConsultingCounsellor Eric Sogocio, Head of the BRICS Section, Embassy of BrazilMr Yaroslav Shishkin, Deputy Head of Economic Section, Embassy of the Russian FederationMr. Randhir Jaiswal, Consul General of India‘The Ufa declaration and its implications for the BRICS brand’Highlights:Successes of BRICS in implementing Summit decisionsImplications of increased formalisation/institutionalisation for development of BRICSDevelopment of BRICS reflects positively on global governance capability of the five member statesThe SA Inc. Project: Publications (2014-2015)A lesson for Brand SA from Nigeria – Be bold, keep it real, and make it quick – a conversation on the art of Nollywood success. 23 August 2014, Brand South AfricaResearch Note. By: Dr Petrus de KockResearching the Nation Brand – background to the concept, and initial findings from fieldwork in Kenya and Nigeria. 18 September 2014. South Africa In(c) SeriesResearch Report #1 By: Dr Petrus de KockAfrican market entry strategy – learning to listen & listening to learn. 12 December 2014. Brand South Africa Research Note #2. 2014. By: Dr Petrus de KockDeveloping an SA Inc strategy for the Nation Brand, 28 July 2015, Brand South Africa Research Report, By: Dr. Judy Smith-Höhn & Dr Petrus de KockThe Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, 30 September 2015, Brands South Africa Research Note, By: Dr. Petrus de KockSA Inc Project: Angola Fieldwork Research Report, 16 November 2015, Brand SA Fieldwork Report, By: Dr. Petrus de Kock & Dr. Judy Smith-HöhnPrepared by Brand SA ResearchContact:Dr Petrus de Kock, GM – Researchpetrusd@brandsouthafrica.comDr Judy Smith-Höhn, Research Managerjudys@brandsouthafrica.comLeigh-Gail Petersen, Researcherleigh@brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

African writing on the rise

first_imgWe Need New Names, Noviolet Bulawayo’s debut novel.(Image: Man Booker Prize website)Noviolet’s name cames from “with” in Ndebele, and Violet was her mother’s name, so she’ll always be with her mother.(Image: creativewriting.stanford.edu)MEDIA CONTACTS • Fungai JamesWeaver Press+263 430 8330.Melissa Jane CookNoviolet Bulawayo, a Zimbabwean author and Stegner Fellow at the United States’s of America’s (USA) elite Stanford University, was shortlisted for the highly acclaimed Man Booker prize. She is also in line for the Guardian First Book Award.Currently on a two-year writing programme at Stanford, Bulawayo is the first black African woman and the first Zimbabwean to be nominated for the Man Booker prize, which promotes the finest in fiction by rewarding the very best book of the year. The most important literary award in the world, it has the power to transform the fortunes and futures of authors and publishers.Born Elizabeth Zandile Tshele in Tsholotsho, Bulawayo, in Zimbabwe, Bulawayo earned her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) at the USA’s Cornell University, where she was also awarded a Truman Capote Fellowship.She adopted her pen name from her mother, Violet, who died when she was 18 months’ old. In the Ndebele group of languages, her first name means ‘with Violet’, while Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second-largest city, is her childhood home.She is the author of the 2011 Caine Prize-winning short story, Hitting Budapest (2010), about a gang of street children in a Zimbabwean shanty town, while her story Snapshot (2009) was shortlisted for the South Africa PEN Studzinski Award.Her latest novel, We Need New Names, has won rave reviews from heavyweight critics around the world. The debut novel explores the toll President Robert Mugabe’s 33 years in power have taken on the country, through the eyes of ten-year-old Darling and her friends Stina, Chipo, Godknows, Sbho and Bastard. The children used to live in proper houses, with real rooms and furniture, but now they live in the ironically named shantytown of Paradise. They spend their days playing, stealing guavas from the wealthy Budapest suburb and wondering how to get the baby out of Chipo’s tummy. They dream of escaping to America, Dubai, and Europe.We Need New Names was launched in September at the National Gallery in Bulawayo.The author told Jill Coates, director of the British Council Zimbabwe: “We Need New Names is coming from a place of colourful names, and I think it’s generally known that Zimbabwe has that kind of culture, where parents give us these names that speak, that say something. They do sound normal in our native languages, but it’s only when you translate them to English that they have an interesting spin to them.”“Africa is the centre of my writing; in America, you walk out the door and nobody notices you. At home you know you’re alive, part of a community, people are in your business.”“During the holidays, we went to the rural areas where we would meet my grandmother and storytelling was the daily form of entertainment. I grew up thinking that it was just normal, that the world was told through stories and my father was also a storyteller.”“I grew up surrounded by people who told stories. It planted the seed.”“At school, I’d always be telling stories to my friends. I started reading books and found a connection: they were also stories, just like the ones I had heard. It really gives a lot to my voice in that when I write, I think of a listener, not necessarily a reader. I think the connection with told stories is more urgent; more true. You get one to two minutes to engage them, which taught me about voice and urgency. Which is why, when I write, my challenge is to write something that the reader can’t put down.”Going homeThe Africa Report states that in April, Bulawayo returned home for the first time in 13 years.“One of the most heart-breaking things,” she says, “was to walk into what used to be the biggest bookstore in the country, Kingston Books, and finding they do not sell novels anymore, only stationery.”She adds, “Books have been our way of engaging with the system, with what’s going on around, so I feel like things are being lost.”However, despite the challenges facing the publishing industry, Bulawayo is very grateful to have found a local publisher, Weaver Press, which has published her novel.On being the first black Zimbabwean woman nominated for the Booker prize, Bulawayo says, “It’s simply amazing, you know, you don’t write to be recognised. You write firstly to tell your story. Then you hope that a reader is going to find it worthwhile so for me to get this kind of recognition at this stage, I’m just starting out. We Need New Names is my first novel and I’m also the first Zimbabwean to ever make it this far and the first black African woman. It’s a very humbling experience and I’m very encouraged to keep working.”Previous African Man Booker Prize winners are South Africa’s Nadine Gordimer and Nigeria’s Ben Okri.*The Man Booker Prize 2013 was won by Eleanor Catton’s The Luminaries, on 15 October at London’s Guildhall.last_img read more

On this day 50 years ago: Mandela arrives at Robben Island

first_imgMandela and Walter Sisulu were both held at Robben Island. Keeping all political prisoners in one prison was a mistake Mandela has said. (Image: Mandela Foundation)• Robben Island revisited digitally • Nelson Mandela: a life in photographs • From Liliesleaf to Robben Island • The Rivonia Trialists today • Places to visit on Madiba’s JourneySulaiman Philip“The names of those who were incarcerated on Robben Island is a roll call of resistance fighters and democrats spanning over three centuries. If indeed this is a Cape of Good Hope, that hope owes much to the spirit of that legion of fighters and others of their calibre.” – Nelson Mandela Inaugural Speech, 1994Today, 50 years ago, Nelson Mandela arrived on Robben Island to begin serving a life sentence after his conviction for sabotage at the Rivonia Trial. For the next 24 years the oval spit of scrubland would be his home. To the warders he was not his reputation – a charismatic leader, a keen amateur boxer and ladies’ man – he was simply prisoner number 46664, a convicted terrorist. But his status as leader of the political prisoners on the island made him a target of abuse from the warders. Realising that he had to draw a in the line sand or the abuse would never end, especially when the mistreatment came close to violence, he turned on his tormentor. “I was frightened; it was not because I was courageous, but one had to put up a front and so he stopped.”  As Mandela remembered, “I say, ‘you dare touch me, I will take you to the highest court in this land and by the time I’m finished with you, you will be as poor as a church mouse’. And he stopped.” For Madiba it was more than just winning peace and respect from his jailers. It was him living the spirit of his philosophy. “I believe the way in which you will be treated by the prison authorities depends on your demeanour and you must fight that battle and win it on the very first day.”June 13 1964 was not Madiba’s first day on Robben Island; he had begun serving a five-year sentence for leaving the country without a passport a year before. He was transported back to Pretoria in June 1963 to stand trial for sabotage in what was to be become known as the Rivonia Trial. Mandela and Walter Sisulu were both held at Robben Island. Keeping all political prisoners in one prison was a mistake Mandela has said. (Image: Mandela Foundation)Robben Island: an isolated worldIn Long Walk to Freedom, his autobiography, Mandela wrote about the ferry ride from Cape Town to Robben Island. “Journeying to Robben Island was like going to another country. Its isolation made it not simply another prison, but a world of its own.”Within hours of their guilty verdict, around midnight of June 12 1964, Mandela and Walter Sisulu, Ahmed Kathrada, Govan Mbeki, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Motsoaledi and Andrew Mlangeni were flown to Robben Island to begin their sentences. Often before his release, first being moved to Pollsmoor and then Victor Verster prisons, Madiba was offered freedom by the apartheid government, but he found the strings they attached too onerous. As younger, more militant activists started arriving as prisoners after the 16 June 1976 Soweto uprising, the older prisoners found an unspoken fear realised. As the struggle had evolved and become more violent in response to more violent oppression, the prisoners on Robben Island were frozen in time. “These young men were a different breed. They were brave, hostile and aggressive; they would not take orders. To be perceived as a moderate was a novel and not altogether pleasant feeling,” Mandela wrote. Robben Island: the tourist attraction“South Africans must recall the terrible past so that we can deal with it, forgiving where forgiveness is necessary but never forgetting.” – Nelson Mandela, on leaving office as South African president, 15 June 1999Today you can take a high-speed ferry from Cape Town and for a half a day walk through the quarry where Mandela’s eyesight was damaged by dust and the glaring sun. A visitor can enjoy the wild life, originally released as hunting stock to feed passing ships.Visitors to Robben Island, today a national heritage site and tourist attraction, are free to roam the concrete jail house and cells that housed the Category D prisoners, or stop over at the shrine of Muslim leader; Tuan Guru; the Lepers Graveyard; and the house where Robert Sobukwe spent nine years in solitary confinement.Each cell is uniformly bleak – a bedroll on the floor, a tiny stool and a ceramic pot – and each was kept spotlessly clean. This simple act of domesticity was revolutionary for the prisoners. “To survive in prison one must develop ways to take satisfaction in one’s daily life. One can feel fulfilled by washing one’s clothes so that they are particularly clean, by sweeping a corridor so that it is free of dust, by organising one’s cell to conserve as much space as possible. The same pride one takes in more consequential tasks outside prison, one can find in doing small things inside prison.”Madiba began his life sentence as a determined politically radicalised activist; he left Robben Island determined to be a leader. The roots of the statesman he became are on the island, or as he said; “Robben Island matured me.”last_img read more

Passivhaus Finds a Home in the Bayou State

first_imgInsulated and airtightThe house has been variously dubbed “the 204House” or the “LeBois House.” The project features R-28 Icynene LD-R-50 walls and an R-55 Icynene LD-R-50 roof, with 2×6 and 2×8 advanced framing, Saft noted in an email to GBA. The exterior walls are wrapped in 1-inch polyisocyanurate, the roof in 2-inch polyiso. Siding consists of pre-painted fiber cement board and white standing seam metal panels. Saft said there is a 1-inch space between the siding and the polyiso to help “shade” the walls and prevent heat and moisture buildup.R-21 extruded polystyrene (XPS) was used for the basement/crawlspace walls, and R-16.5 XPS under the slab. Saft also used SeriousWindows’ 501 series vinyl-frame windows, with SeriousGlass 8 double-pane glass.The one renewable-energy component of the house is a 3.25-kW thin-film photovoltaic system by Houston-based WhirlwindSolar. Although sustainable materials and energy efficient design have found their way into some post-Katrina residential rebuilds on the Gulf Coast, Louisiana isn’t otherwise known for leading the charge to greener home construction. And that puts the house built by architect Corey Saft at the forefront of green housing in the state.The home, a 1,200-sq.-ft. three-bedroom, two-bath in the south-central town of Lafayette, is in fact an anomaly in Louisiana, mainly because Saft designed it to qualify not only for LEED Platinum certification but also certification by Passive House Institute US.Saft, a professor of architecture at the University of Louisiana, told the Lafayette-based news daily The Advocate that the building’s energy-recovery ventilator – an UltimateAir RecoupAerator, with MERV 12 filters – will deliver exceptional air quality. The home’s overall airtightness and shell insulation, he adds, make it “a little bit of an experiment” for housing in the Louisiana climate. RELATED ARTICLES Following Up on a Passive House in the Deep SouthDoes Passivhaus Work in New Orleans?Passive Aggressive The LeBois House in LafayettePassive House? The Le Bois Houselast_img read more

Backers & Hackers Start Playing With App.net

first_imgOver the weekend, budding Twitter competitor App.net reached its funding goal of $500,000. Already the service has an alpha website and an API, allowing backers and hackers alike to play with it. As to be expected, the early users are geeky – and mostly male. It’s fun watching a nascent service find its legs. In particular how third party developers are experimenting with the API, which has been available for less than a week. Here’s a look at what App.net is currently, along with some early third party apps.App.net is a short messaging service like Twitter. The key differences are: a) it has a 256 character limit instead of 140, b) there won’t be any ads on it, and c) users can control their own data (for example export it).App.net exists because its founders believe that Twitter has become too focused on advertisers, instead of the users and developers which are at the heart of any social service.Here’s what App.net looks like in its present, very early, incarnation: Tags:#social networks#web Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification We’re all excited to see what App.net will turn into. Some of us from ReadWriteWeb are playing in the sandbox: yours truly Richard MacManus @ricmac; Jon Mitchell @ablaze (user #18, he proudly notes); Dan Frommer @fromedome.Or perhaps, rather than us nerds, you’d prefer to follow Stephen Fry, a celebrity Twitter user who – just like the rest of us – is curious to see if App.net will take off. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Related Posts center_img richard macmanus Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… The directory of third party devs and apps, on GitHub, is beginning to fill out with web services, mobile apps and browser extensions. Here are just a few of the early third party apps, which give a taste of things to come: The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more

Deb Calvert on How Truly Meaningful Sales Connections Happen Through Leadership  – Episode #105

first_imgTweets you can use to share this episode#Buyers don’t believe the message until they first believe the messenger – from Deb Calvert on this episode of #InTheArena @PeopleFirstPS #salesClick To Tweet#Sales connections happen through two-way dialogue, not an old-fashioned sales presentation. Learn how to make it happen on #InTheArena @PeopleFirstPSClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 32:21 — 26.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSEvery seller wants to have meaningful sales connections with their buyers, but it’s clear from the way sales is traditionally done that very few sellers really know how to pull it off. Deb Calvert has written a new book, “Stop Selling and Start Leading” that reveals many points of powerfully insightful data, taken from a study focused on the 30 primary characteristics of leadership. Her application of those characteristics to the sales process is not only ingenious, it also reveals what sellers are doing wrong, what buyers really want from those who are on the other side of the sales relationship, and how powerful selling can happen once sellers stop selling in begin leading. You don’t want to miss this conversation.Deb Calvert on How Truly Meaningful #Sales Connections Happen Through #Leadership – Episode 106 of #InTheArena @PeopleFirstPSClick To TweetBuyers don’t believe the message until they first believe the messengerSales connections are about more than simply setting appointments and running through a sales presentation. It’s about building trust, a phrase we are hearing more and more these days. But do you really know what it means to build trust? More importantly, do you know how to build it? Deb Calvert says that buyers don’t believe anything you have to say to them about your product or service until they first believe in you. They have to see, demonstrated in your behavior, that you are person who can be trusted. What kinds of behavior is Deb talking about? Listen to this episode of In The Arena to find out – and learn how to change the way you sell in order to build greater trust with your buyers.33% of buyers say the salespeople they deal with don’t come across as credibleMuch of the research that Deb and her team did in preparation for her book focused on the experiences buyers had with those who sold to them. In many cases, these were relationships that were already established between buyer and seller – yet 33% of buyers said that the sales people they deal with regularly don’t come across as credible or trustworthy. What does that say about the way sales professionals are going about their work? More importantly, what does it say about the ways we can improve what we do to cause trust to be built from the outset? Deb’s insights into this issue of credibility and trust are incredibly helpful for salespeople who are willing to do the work it takes to apply what she has learned. The good news is this, none of it is hard. It just has to be done.33% of #buyers say the #salespeople they deal with don’t come across as credible. Learn how to reverse this trend in your #sales career on #InTheArena @PeopleFirstPSClick To TweetSales connections happen through two-way dialogue, not an old-fashioned sales presentationOne of the things that buyers dread the most is the sales presentation. That’s because it often goes into data points and information that isn’t relevant to their situation. It’s kind of like sitting through a timeshare presentation in order to get the free gift, only the buyer doesn’t always walk away with the free gift. Deb’s research revealed that sales connections that matter happen through two-way dialogue, not a sales presentation. Buyers want to know that they are understood and that those selling to them truly have their best interests in mind. If you will apply the simple things Deb shares in her book, “Stop Selling and Start Leading,” your sales will dramatically improve.Meaningful connections between buyers and sellers still matterWith all the advancements in A.I. and machine learning, there is a lot of hype about whether or not salespeople will really be needed in the future. Both Deb and Anthony believe that the human component of sales will always be in high demand because meaningful sales connections are what build the kind of trust that buyers need to feel. It still matters that there is a person on the other end of a transaction. It still matters that someone with empathy and understanding can approach a buyer’s needs with insight and right applications. As you listen to this conversation you’ll come to realize the truth: meaningful connections in sales still matter and always will.Meaningful #connections between #buyers and #sellers still matter. Learn what Deb Calvert discovered about the buyer-seller relationship on this episode of #InTheArena @PeopleFirstPSClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Who is Deb Calvert? The kind of research Deb did in her decision to write her book The gap between what buyers want to see in their sellers and what exists What does it mean for sellers to model the way? Buyers need sellers to demonstrate that they have THEIR best interest in mind Why salespeople are hesitant about inspiring a shared vision What does it mean to challenge the process? The thing that matters most to buyers is relevant answers in a timely way Meaningful connections between buyers and sellers still matterResources & Links mentioned in this episodewww.StopSellingStartLeading.comwww.PeopleFirstPS.com – Deb’s websiteDeb on Social – LinkedIn – Twitter – YouTube – FacebookThe Outbound ConferenceBOOK: Stop Selling, Start LeadingBOOK: The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever NeedJim KouzesBarry PosnerThe Leadership ChallengeThe theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Sand mafia beats Sarpanch to death in Rajasthan

first_imgThe ban imposed on ‘bajri’ (riverbed sand) mining in Rajasthan took an ugly turn with the sand mafia allegedly beating a 50-year-old sarpanch to death in Sawai Madhopur district on Thursday. Raghuveer Singh Meena, sarpanch of Hathdoli village, was killed when he went to the Bouli area to check loading of sand illegally dug out of the Banas river.His body was cremated in his native village on Friday. Police registered a case of murder against 21 persons, including nine accused. People involved in illegal sand mining, armed with sticks and stones, attacked Mr. Meena, who was accompanied by a team of Mining Department and a few policemen. The accused hurled stones on the officials when they entered the land in Hindpura village and forced them to retreat. ‘Bled to death’In the melee, Mr. Meena was injured by a stone and fell on the ground. The assailants fled and a profusely bleeding Sarpanch was rushed to a hospital in Sawai Madhopur. He was later referred to Jaipur, but he succumbed to his injuries.last_img read more