Pollard’s whirlwind knock cripples KKR

first_imgMUMBAI India, CMC:Kieron Pollard equalled the fastest half-century of the Indian Premier League this season and became only the sixth playerin history to eclipse 6,000 Twenty20 runs, as he propelled Mumbai Indians to an emphatic six-wicket victory over Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) yesterday.Set 175 for victory at the Wankhede Stadium, the hosts romped to their target with two overs remaining, with Pollard blasting an unbeaten 51 from a mere 17 deliveries.He arrived at the crease at the end of the 13th over, with reigning champions Mumbai still requiring 69 for victory, and dominated the remainder of the innings, striking two fours and six sixes.Captain Rohit Sharma struck an unbeaten 68 off 49 deliveries while Ambati Rayudu chipped in with 32.Pollard’s West Indies teammate and fellow Trinidadian, off-spinner Sunil Narine, produced a brilliant spell of two for 22 from his four overs, but was unable to halt Mumbai’s charge.Earlier, Gautam Gambhir top-scored with 59 off 45 balls in a 69-run, first-wicket stand with Robin Uthappa, who made 36 from 20 balls, after KKR were asked to bat. Batting at number five, AndrÈ Russell stroked 22 off 16 balls with three fours before he was bowled by Kiwi paceman Tim Southee in the 18th over.In reply, opener Parthiv Patel (1) fell to the seventh delivery of the innings with the score on eight for one, but Rohit and Rayudu added 59 for the second wicket to launch the recovery.But three wickets fell for 39 runs in the space of 37 balls to derail the run chase and much rested on Pollard’s shoulders when he arrived at the crease.Pollard, who now has 6009 runs, is the second West Indies player in the 6000-run club along with Chris Gayle, who leads the career T20 aggregates with 8,840 runs.With the victory, Mumbai moved into third spot on eight points, behind KKR only on net run rate, with Gujarat Lions two points clear at the top.last_img read more

South African market hungry for the Joule

first_imgJoules will go on sale in 2013.(Image: Optimal Energy)MEDIA CONTACTS• Jaco van LoggerenbergMedia LiaisonOptimal Energy+27 21 462 7804 or +27 82 903 7947RELATED ARTICLES• Model ‘green’ car in SA for World Cup• Mercedes-Benz SA tops for quality• Electrifying SA’s motor industry• VW SA wins multibillion contractBongani NkosiThe South African market looks ready to buy into the Joule, the country’s first stylish electric car.Although it will only be mass-produced late in 2012 and go on sale in 2013, there’s already a considerable demand for it, said Jaco van Loggerenberg, spokesperson for the car’s developer, Optimal Energy.“Demand in South Africa is there and it will grow,” he said. “We get phone calls from customers everyday, people are asking where they can buy the Joule.”The South African Department of Science and Technology and state-owned Industrial Development Corporation have invested heavily in Optimal Energy to get the project off the ground.Optimal Energy is a private South African company based in Cape Town.South Africa is proving to be one of the markets willing to embrace eco-friendly electrical cars, according to Van Loggerenberg. “You can see that readiness in many countries is growing. You see a level of readiness even in South Africa.”Most potential buyers have indicated they are concerned about conventional vehicles’ impact on the environment. “People want the electric car because it has fewer emissions,” said Van Loggerenberg.Export plans The outlook is that Joule sales will surge in the UK and other European countries, where there’s already strong demand for electric vehicles.Optimal Energy is planning to produce between 30 000 and 50 000 Joule units per year from 2013. “A lot of these cars would go to Europe, looking at the readiness of those countries,” Van Loggerenberg said.“The South African market is important to us,” he added, “we’ll sell many cars in South Africa, as much as the market can absorb”.Optimal Energy is hoping that the South African government will give incentives to electric car buyers, as is already done in countries like UK, the US, Japan, France and Spain.Chic, high-speed vehicleThe Joule, launched at the Paris Motor Show in 2008, is a trendy four-wheel vehicle with a top speed of 135km/h, enabling it to drive on highways. The five-seater zero carbon-emission car is powered by a lithium-ion battery which, if charged overnight, could last for about 300km.But experts say the Joule is more suitable for urban motorists, who drive about 150km a day.The batteries are currently produced by South Korea’s Energy Innovation Group, but there are plans to manufacture them in South Africa closer to production time, Van Loggerenberg said.The Joule also has an additional solar panel fitted on its rooftop to power accessories like the air-conditioner and electric windows.The vehicle, designed by South African-born Keith Helfet, a former top designer at Jaguar, will sell for between R235 000 and R285 000 (US$31 000 and $37 700).Creating jobsAll Joule cars will be manufactured in South Africa, with the production plant certain to be set up in Port Elizabeth or East London in the Eastern Cape province.The project is expected to create between 8 000 and 10 000 jobs for locals, “which will be of great benefit to South Africa”, Van Loggerenberg said.A limited number of Joule cars will be released onto the South African market later in 2010 to test the public’s interest. “We want to gauge feedback from customers and the media,” said Van Loggerenberg.last_img read more

Mike Lutmer, Nov. 7

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We will hopefully finish beans by the end of the week. They have been averaging right around 50, maybe a little better. I’ve had a few fields where I was pleasantly surprised with the beans. They were a little spotty when they came up last spring but as a whole I can’t complain.We ran into a little bit of green stem last week. We had a light frost two weeks ago and they are calling for a solid frost next Friday or Saturday, which should help.I haven’t gotten a lot of corn yet. It has been all over the board. My uncle has been shelling and it has been OK. It is coming out dry and the yields are average at best at 130 to 160 bushels or something like that. Most of it has been near the bottom of that range.We had some tops starting to break out. Hopefully we don’t get any big windstorms or we’ll probably have some corn going down. Right now everything is still standing OK, but I am concerned. If everything cooperates, we’ll have beans finished this week and in the following week we can have the corn pretty well wrapped up.I ran a field of double-crops last night and they were around 30 bushels. Some guys in the county were pushing 50 bushels with their double-crops.We have been fortunate as far as weather goes for harvest so far. I hope I am not jinxing myself with harvest by saying that.We have most of our wheat in and the wheat that is in is up and looking good.last_img read more

Pocket 4K and Pocket 6K Owners — BRAW Comes to Premiere Pro

first_imgHere’s some highly anticipated news for the Pocket 4K and Pocket 6K — you can now use BRAW in Premiere Pro and Avid.In the 1.5 update to Blackmagic RAW, Windows and Linux editors can now download the Blackmagic RAW Speed Test to find out just how under-optimized your computer is — and how 24 fps 8K playback is still a little ways off for consumers. Also included are under-the-hood improvements to the Blackmagic RAW Player.However, the most significant inclusion to the update is that you can now use Blackmagic RAW in Premiere Pro and Avid, with plug-ins installed with 1.5. Being able to use the format in Premiere has been one of the most requested features since the release of Blackmagic RAW.There’s no denying that Blackmagic has spent the last few years trying to get a wider audience to see Resolve not only as a professional color grading software but also as an editing platform for users of any skill level. Likewise, in addition to unleashing an army of certified trainers, Blackmagic also released a training series on their social channels to equip new users with the knowledge they need to navigate Resolve.With such a strong push toward acquiring a larger user base, many had wondered if BRAW was going to remain native to Resolve. It would’ve been a surefire way to keep users on the platform, but Blackmagic has been very open about their new format (like offering a fully documented software development kit), so it didn’t seem like a direction they would take. It’s just that we didn’t hear any official word on cross-NLE compatibility.After the initial release, it was only a week before transcoding tutorials came out, so users could take their BRAW footage from Resolve and edit in Premiere. And, a few months after the release of BRAW, Autokroma released a $29 Premiere Pro plug-in that allows users to directly import BRAW, with the internal RAW properties fully adjustable, within the effects panel.However, all that has been nipped in the bud, making BRAW studio obsolete — as with 1.5, you directly import BRAW into Premiere. The plug-in is automatically installed to Premiere’s directory, so upon running the 1.5 execution file, there’s nothing else you need to do.BRAW in PremiereIn one of our Resolve vs. Premiere showdowns, we talked about how Resolve favors GPU but also leans on CPU processing, while Premiere Pro is primarily CPU dominant with slight GPU support. The BRAW plug-in for Premiere only uses CPU. Therefore, you’re not going to see the same speed and capacity with the format in Resolve. However, as noted in Newsshooter‘s interview with Blackmagic, they do intend on incorporating Premiere’s GPU acceleration in the future.You can manipulate the BRAW info in Premiere’s effects panel, just as you would if you had added an effect to a video clip. However, unlike Premiere’s video effects — when added, they appear stacked in the effects panel — you have to select a separate tab in the effects window, which (at first) is quite missable.When you click the BRAW tab, you’ll get a variety of RAW settings to manipulate.While the plug-in doesn’t feature all the elements you can find when using a BRAW file in Resolve, the key features are here. As stated in the press release, when you move your projects from Premiere Pro, or Avid, into Resolve for grading and finishing, all of the camera RAW metadata is still there.Full Press ReleaseToday, we released Blackmagic RAW 1.5. This new version introduces a cross-platform version of Blackmagic RAW Speed Test, which is now available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. Blackmagic RAW Speed Test is a CPU and GPU benchmarking tool for testing the speed of decoding full resolution Blackmagic RAW frames on your system. Multiple CPU cores and GPUs are automatically detected and used during the test so that you get accurate and realistic results. Simply select Blackmagic RAW constant bitrate 3:1, 5:1, 8:1, or 12:1, and the desired resolution to perform the test. Results are displayed in an easy-to-read table that shows how many frames per second the computer can decode for all supported resolutions.In addition, Blackmagic RAW 1.5 also includes plug-ins that add support for editing native Blackmagic RAW files in Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer. These new plug-ins enable editors to work with Blackmagic RAW, directly, so they no longer have to transcode files. That means camera original Blackmagic RAW files can be used throughout the entire workflow. There is no longer a need to create proxy files and conform edits for finishing. These plug-ins bring the quality of RAW in small, modern, GPU, and CPU accelerated files that are faster and easier to work with than any other video format. Best of all, when projects are moved from Premiere Pro or Media Composer into DaVinci Resolve for color correction and finishing, all of the camera RAW metadata and image quality is still there.Blackmagic RAW SDK 1.5 is available now as a free download from www.blackmagicdesign.com/support.Looking for more from Blackmagic? Check out these articles.How to Mount the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K on the Ronin-MBlackmagic Announces The Pocket Cinema Camera 6K – EF MountHow to Take Photos with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4KBuilding A Low Budget Handheld Rig For The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4KViltrox vs. Metabones: Speed Booster for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Cameralast_img read more

How Steve Smith made millions of dollars through 12000 return on small

first_imgSmith has raked in a huge profit from his 2015 investmentMatt King/Getty ImagesWhen it rains, it pours! Steve Smith’s luck seems to have turned round drastically. After getting disgraced for his actions as a captain in sanctioning ball-tampering, he is back to his best. The back-to-back hundreds scored by the right-hander in the first Ashes Test have re-asserted his credentials as the world’s best Test batsman. But it’s not just on the field that the former captain is making a killing.Recently, an investment of Aus $100,000 that he had made in a company called Koala Mattresses, led to a windfall profit as he earned Aus $12.1 million in return. The investment made by Smith was in return for a 10% stake in the company. This masterstroke by the man with 25 Test hundreds was played in 2015. Since then, the firm has grown exponentially to have more than 200,000 customers and a valuation of Aus $150 million. As a result of this massive profit, Smith now has made more money from his stake in Koala than through his cricket-related deals. According to some media outlets, Smith makes Aus $2 million from his duties as an Aussie cricketer. To add to that, his IPL contract brings him an equally large sum. The ball-tampering scandal had left Smith disgraced, but only temporarilySTR/AFP/Getty ImagesThe total valuation of Smith is bound to come to around Aus $31 million, according to estimates by agencies. This windfall gain from Koala Mattresses would also completely wipe out the loss that the 30-year old suffered due to the sandpaper-gate controversy. With him losing the opportunity to play for Australia for one year and also not being allowed into the IPL, the New South Welshman is estimated to have endured a loss of Aus $7 million.But all the turmoil and embarrassment that the former captain had to face has been replaced by adulation and admiration in his home country after his good performances in the World Cup as well as the two brilliant knocks against England. All these emerged despite the extremely hostile reaction dished out by the English crowds continuously to him.While many spectators brought sandpapers to the ground and have waved them at him and the other two players – David Warner and Cameron Bancroft – who were involved in the infamous saga, others have booed him relentlessly despite his superlative batting.But the rest of the world seems to be warming up to him once again. During Australia’s match vs India in the ICC 2019 World Cup, when some Indian fans targeted Smith, the captain of the Men in Blue, Virat Kohli, admonished them and asked for a show of respect towards his rival. Times have certainly changed for the fidgety run-machine of Australia.last_img read more

Media personality Muhammad Jahangir no more

first_imgMedia personality Muhammad Jahangir. File photoMuhammad Jahangir, a noted media personality and executive director of Centre for Development Communication, died at a hospital in the capital early Wednesday. He was 68.Jahangir, a journalist and younger brother of Noble laureate Yunus, breathed his last around 12:40am at Asgar Ali Hospital in the city, said Tanbirul Islam, assistant general manager of Yunus Centre.He had been suffering from cancer. He was admitted to the hospital on Monday and kept on life support.He left behind his wife, one daughter, three sons and a host of relatives to mourn his death.last_img read more

San Jacinto County Judge Arrested On Charges That He Forged Document

first_imgPhoto via San Jacinto County Sheriff’s OfficeSan Jacinto County Judge John Lovett Jr. was arrested MondayA county judge in Texas has been arrested on charges that he broke into a county clerk’s office and forged a government document.San Jacinto County Judge John Lovett Jr. was arrested Monday on charges of burglary, forgery and tampering with an official government instrument.Court records indicate Lovett, the top elected official in the county north of Houston, used a master key in July to enter the clerk’s office after-hours. He then allegedly used the clerk’s timestamp to approve the agenda for that month’s county commissioners’ meeting.It’s not clear why Lovett sought to timestamp the agenda, rather than relying on the clerk to do it.He’s previously said his actions fell under his authority.Lovett was booked into the county jail Monday and later released. Sharelast_img read more

May 17th

first_imgA memory from a young Baltimore woman whose life was changed radically by the landmark Brown v Board decision of 1954. May 17, 1954 marked a defining moment in the history of the United States. The Supreme Court declared the doctrine of “separate but equal” unconstitutional and handed The NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund the most celebrated victory in its storied history. Reversing the 1896 the Supreme Court’s decision that separate but equal educational facilities for Negroes were legal. I’m sure you’ve seen the film and pictures of all of the White women upset about their children going to school with Black children. On that evening in May, like everyone in America who had a TV, I was watching the 10 inch black and white television; witnessing the drama being played out. In New York I had gone to Catholic School with a little redhead boy named Greenberg. At Holy Providence for Negros and Indians in Cornwells Heights, Pa., the convent where I was a boarding student; we were taught the Great Books and nothing about being a Negro or an Indian. In Saipan I was in school with children who looked like me and spoke a different language. Together we learned to eat Spam. Therefore, I could not imagine why these women did not want their children to go to school with me. To be perfectly honest I was more interested in the events of Baltimore than going to school. In the fall of 1953 Baltimore came alive. The electricity in the air was palpable. The Baltimore Colts had moved to town. Everyone, Black and white, welcomed the Colts with open arms. Baltimore was the Colts and the Colts were Baltimore. The great Buddy Young became my neighbor. Imagine, I could babysit for his family. One of the first Blacks to play pro football (after the “unofficial” ban from 1934 to 1945) Buddy Young #22, experienced the humiliations of prejudice. But Buddy Young always insisted that the worst prejudice he encountered was against his size being the shortest NLF player. He said his size was not a disadvantage and delighted in outsmarting larger opponents who attempted to tackle him. ”They hate to miss the little man, who can make them look foolish, so they hesitate,” he once said. ”That’s beautiful.” With Buddy Young being only a few inches taller than me, I learned to love my short genes. April 15, 1954, one month before the Brown v. BOE, big-league baseball came to town when the St. Louis Browns arrived with the new name The Baltimore Orioles for the 1954 season. The 1954 Opening Day Parade made its way through downtown. I love a parade. At the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Camden Station, the Orioles – having traveled from Detroit, stepped off the train and into Baltimore’s version of wonderland. Other than the traditional “Animal Walk” Circus Parade coming to town with the a herd of 18 elephants, trunk to tail in chain gang style, leading the way from the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus trains pulling the tents and the roustabouts dressed up as clowns, offered a dose of magic not obtainable anywhere else. The 1954 Opening Day Parade was the biggest parade I could remember. Baltimore had no Beltway, no Harbor Tunnel, and no Jones Falls Expressway. Working farms prospered inside the city; Howard Street was rows of beautiful bustling segregated department stores. Banana boats offloaded their bushels onto wharves where the Inner Harbor now stands. I loved the sight of the ships in the harbor, the sounds of streetcar trolleys on the cobblestone streets, the taste of the juicy red plug from the watermelon man (A-rabbers) with his horse-drawn cart. People took such pride in their white marble steps, and oh, how I hated polishing the brass railing lining those white steps. Mrs. Johnson, our next-door neighbor, was out to see that I did it right. The character of each neighborhood was on display. The descendants from Eastern European neighborhoods painted beautiful religious scenes on the front window screen. Anyway, that 17th day in May, when the decision was handed down, in that same TV news broadcast with the White women screaming and yelling, there was the very gracious, calm Mrs. Mildred Coughlin the principal of Western High School, beautifully styled white hair and dressed in a soft pink suit. I was taken aback by her comment, and I quote, “I will never see a colored girl graduate from my school.” Her school, Western High School, was one of the high class schools in Baltimore. At that time, some schools in Baltimore were not only segregated by race and they were also segregated by gender. The top schools in Baltimore were all that way, male and female. Western High School was the best, of all girl schools. Baltimore became the first City in the United States to integrate public schools.Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (BPI) had an unusually advanced and difficult college engineering “A” preparatory curriculum. After a law suit by the Baltimore Urban League and the NAACP on behalf of 16 Black male students, a settlement was reached. In the fall of 1952, Elmer (Buddy) W. German Jr. and his lifelong friend Victor Dates were among the first Black males to attend BPI. One cold day in winter of 1954 Buddy walked away. His mother was stunned, she was so proud of her oldest son. “Mom, yes my grades are good, yes I can keep up and no I cannot not tolerate the harassment any longer. He transferred to Douglass High School to graduate in 1956. In complete candor Buddy German was my best friend’s brother and my “starter husband.” May 1954, Walter Sondheim Jr. became president of the Board of School Commissioners of Baltimore City immediately after the Brown vs. Board decision and instantaneously implemented desegregation throughout the city. The NAACP, along with CORE, the Urban League, other civil rights organizations and the AFRO had actively pushed Maryland into being the first state south of the Mason-Dixon Line to accept the Brown decision. As the gateway to the south, Maryland and especially Baltimore needed to be seen by the world as being able to implement civil rights objectives before the south would even give it a try. Gov. Theodore McKeldin, on May 17, refused an invitation by Southern governors to consider plans for circumventing the Supreme Court’s decision. June 1954, Dr. John H. Fisher, superintendent of schools for Baltimore, detailed a four point program of integration for all public schools. The Board of Education approved unanimously. By the end of August, I was told we would go to “her school,” Western High School. There were five of us and we were hand-picked to start September 7, 1954, in the 11th grade, which was the junior year. Western High School was on Center Street a half block away from the AFRO building on Eutaw Street where my, Elizabeth Murphy Oliver, was firmly ensconced; this made perfect sense to pick me. However, on the other side of town, things did not go so smoothly. Oct. 4, 1954, near City Hall, a group of white students from Baltimore schools demonstrated against integration. Police held back white students at Southern High. Three days earlier, many students, led by their parents, boycotted classes in protest. Mayor Thomas D’Alesandro, who had the city build 87 new schools, providing new facilities for Black students who had been relegated to inferior segregated buildings, prior to Brown v. BOE, appealed for “cool heads” to prevail. The administration of Baltimore held to their commitment of school integration. At Western High School students and teachers were very nice; at least no one was ugly. No one was overt, it was covert racism. No one spoke to me. I suppose their parents had taught them if you cannot say something nice, do not say anything at all. The five of us were in different classes, different curriculums, so we weren’t together. No shared class notes, no social activities, none of the things that go along with high school. The entire time in school was spent very quiet. I guess in retrospect that was good because I learned a lot. I didn’t have anything else to do. And even if I had told my mother no one would speak to me, her first comment would have been, “You’re not supposed to be talking in school, and you’re supposed to be learning.” As you may suspect, I love to talk. Anyway we got through. May of 1956, just before graduation, we had done all we were supposed to do. Mrs. Coughlin, the principal, had been courteous to us; she had never been unkind or anything like that. However, just before graduation, Mrs. Coughlin turned her face to the wall and died. She never saw a colored girl graduate from her school. Now, I took it very personal, and as you can see it’s been 58 years and I will get over it- just not today. “Although the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown was ultimately unanimous, it occurred only after a hard-fought, multi-year campaign to persuade all nine justices to overturn the “separate but equal” doctrine that their predecessors had endorsed in the Court’s infamous 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision,” explains the NAACP’s Legal Defense profile of the historic ruling that redefined the history of the United States. “This campaign was conceived in the 1930s by Charles Hamilton Houston, then Dean of Howard Law School, and brilliantly executed in a series of cases over the next two decades by his star pupil, Thurgood Marshall, who became LDF’s first Director-Counsel.” The drama took place in the towns and cities across the South, to the greater woe of the white bigots, but it will pass into history as something that has happened to us all, children of this age, and it will remain in our lives forever. Read more on Afro.com and the AFRO’s Facebook page.last_img read more