Goodbye to waste in soccer

first_imgA scenario that would affect agents, who charge a percentage of player transfers. José Antonio Martín ‘Petón’, CEO of the Bahía Internacional representation agency, although he is no longer at the forefront of this business, is on the path: “The coronavirus can air soccer. It is a good time to seek common sense and bring order. An elite group of 5-6 crazy teams against which nobody can compete was being created. You cannot deny them that they have a higher income, but you can force them to spend similarly to others. Still they would have a margin of superiority over the rest, but not so obscene. It is a matter of sensible majorities and they may be forced to do so. Barcelona has a severe liquidity risk and maybe they have to be the one to take the plunge“The circumstances point to an opportunity to bring sanity to this aspect. It has been very generous and detached. It will be a time of reflection and readjustment. The contracts are going to adapt to this scenario and new clauses will be included to put variables that if there is no activity, you do not charge, “adds Liébana.Manuel García Quilón, another of the great agents of Spanish soccer players, does not share limiting the market: “This crisis is going to reduce income and curb investment in players. But Limiting the market has no legal coverage. Within the legal parameters, each one can be managed as they see fit and they decide what they can invest. With less income, there will be fewer transfers” Jorge Ibarrola, a lawyer, maintains a position close to Quilón’s: “FIFA should be in charge of regulating these ceilings and it would be necessary to see if these measures are in accordance with the European regulations on economic freedom and movement of players. Furthermore, look at the side effects. A limitation could favor the greats. It would be easier for players to switch teams with cheaper transfers, and powerful clubs could secure salary caps for players, while smaller ones could not.“ Times of austerity come to football. The coronavirus has misplaced the budgets of the clubs, which have been cut off from the income tap (television rights, tickets, subscriptions, marketing …) and are trying to survive by reducing the spending on the wages of their players and workers. Experts consulted by AS assure that the impact of the pandemic could be a turning point for an economic model who has managed to make transfers for 222 million euros (Neymar’s to PSG) and salaries of up to 8.3 million a month (Messi, according to L’Equipe). Now, there are several voices that predict that the economic bubble of soccer is going to deflate and are committed to limiting transfers and player salaries.Gay of Liébana, professor of economics, is the first to analyze this bubble: “The whole world of football is scared and there may be a puncture. There will be prudence and sanity in the market because there is no money coming in. Perhaps nothing will ever be like before” Jaime Fortuño, professor at the EAE Business School, believes that it will be a drop in the market that can be recovered in the coming years: “It is going to deflate, but it will come back. It is not a problem of soccer as a business. The superficial properties will disappear only a year or two. Now it will be difficult to see big signings and the clubs are going to think about making big investments, although signing an Mbappé or Neymar offers you a great return. It will also affect those who want to sell players like Dembélé and Coutinho and do not end up doing it because it would be for less than 100 million. “Carles Murillo, President of the Spanish Society for Sport Economics, also bets on austerity in the next market and a reformulation of the system: “The bubble swells as demand increases and football has squeezed the goose that lays the golden eggs with so many games. In life these situations make you rethink things. More than one will think of putting things in a more economically reasonable environment. I do not see it feasible to pay a lot for players, except for the clubs that have people with many reserves behind them. There will be a devaluation of prices by players. This would be the time for you to temporarily an American-style transfer limitation is imposed. Limit wages and transfers. Although it would have to be in the short term as a shock measure. “last_img read more

Derrick Hall satisfied with Dbacks buying and se

first_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Are you kidding me?Mike McCoy?@LarryFitzgerald not even on the field?Vikings stuff Cardinals!At 1 yard line.— Larry Fitzgerald Sr. (@FitzBeatSr) October 14, 2018 Tough to win in the NFL Steve Wilks appears to have put offense in questionable hands.@LarryFitzgerald has never gone 6 games without a TD.🏈 41 Comments   Share   — Larry Fitzgerald Sr. (@FitzBeatSr) October 14, 2018Larry Fitzgerald is from Minnesota and playing his sixth and potentially final game on the road against the Vikings.Related LinksCardinals defensive line, now healthy, disrupting Vikings pass game earlyRB David Johnson is still the foundation of the Cardinals’ offenseEarlier in the game, Fitzgerald extended his record of consecutive games with a reception to 127.At the time of the play call, the Cardinals trailed the Vikings by a score of 10-3. Top Stories Arizona Cardinals running back David Johnson (31) breaks a tackle by Minnesota Vikings cornerback Trae Waynes (26) during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn) The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Larry Fitzgerald’s father was not happy with the Arizona Cardinals call on fourth and goal from the two-yard line.The play was a run up the middle with David Johnson, but Fitzgerald’s issue with offensive coordinator Mike McCoy’s play call was that his son was not on the field.last_img read more