US$20M Loan for Gbarnga-Salayea Road Project Under Scrutiny

first_imgThe Plenary of the House of Representatives has mandated the Committees on Ways, Means, Finance and Development Planning, Foreign Affairs and Judiciary to review a US$20 million Loan Agreement signed between Liberia and the Saudi Fund for Development (SFD).The committees are expected to advise the House’s plenary in two weeks, whether or not the Loan Agreement should be ratified.The committees were set-up owing to a communication from President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf requesting the House to ratify the Loan Agreement.The purpose of the loan is to generate finance for the rehabilitation of the Gbarnga-Salayea Road Project. This loan is critical and aims to develop an existing gravel road of approximately 81km in length, with a width of 7.5m, connecting Bong and Lofa counties, as well as improving accessibility and reducing traveling costs for residents of the affected counties and those commuting in and through the counties.The Government of Liberia will pay interest at the rate of one percent per annum on the principle amount of the loan withdrawn and outstanding. Interest and other charges shall be paid semi-annually, the letter said.The term of the loan is thirty years, including a ten-year grace period. Government will repay the principal amount of the loan in accordance with Amortization Schedule set forth in Schedule #3 of the agreement.The President added: “Hon. Speaker, this agreement is in support of the government’s overall development agenda, and I trust that the Legislature will ratify it.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Secular Turks protest Gul presidency

first_imgMore than 300,000 took part in a similar rally in the capital Ankara two weeks ago. “This government is the enemy of Ataturk,” said 63-year-old Ahmet Yurdakul, a retired government employee among the demonstrators on Sunday. “It wants to drag Turkey to the Dark Ages.” On Friday, Gul failed to win a first round of voting in parliament after opposition lawmakers boycotted the vote. The opposition then appealed to the Constitutional Court to annul the result on grounds that there was not a quorum present at the time of the vote. That night, the military threatened to intervene in the election and warned the government to curb Islamic influences. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ISTANBUL, Turkey – At least 700,000 people marched Sunday in a massive protest against the possible election of an observant Muslim as president, a conflict that is pitting Turkey’s religiously oriented ruling party against the deeply secular military and civilian establishment. Waving the country’s red flag and singing nationalist songs, demonstrators in Istanbul demanded the resignation of the pro-Islamic government, calling Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan a traitor. Erdogan’s foreign minister, Abdullah Gul, is widely expected to win the presidential election by the country’s 550-seat parliament. “We don’t want a covered woman in Ataturk’s presidential palace,” protester Ayse Bari, a 67-year-old housewife, said in reference to Gul’s wife Hayrunisaah, who wears the Muslim headscarf. “We want civilized, modern people there.” The election has reignited a conflict over Turkey’s national identity that has brewed since Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, an army officer in World War I, founded the secular republic after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. He gave the vote to women, restricted Islamic dress and replaced the Arabic script with the Roman alphabet. But Islam remained potent at the grass-roots level, and some leaders with a religious background have portrayed themselves as an alternative to the secular establishment. Many, including powerful generals, fear Gul would use the presidency – a post with veto power over legislation – to assist his ally, Erdogan, in chipping away at the separation of state and religion. For example, secularists want to preserve a ban on Islamic headscarves in government offices and other public places; Gul’s wife once appealed to the European Court of Human Rights for the right to wear the scarf to a university. The military hinted it may step in to resolve the deadlock over Gul in parliament. And many Turks are calling for early elections in the hope of replacing the parliament, which is dominated by Gul’s pro-Islamic ruling party. “Turkey is secular and will remain secular!” shouted thousands of protesters, many of whom traveled overnight to Istanbul from across the country. Turkish police estimated their numbers at about 700,000 and cordoned off the protest area, conducting searches at several entry points. last_img read more