Stephen A. damns Jimmy G. with faint praise after 49ers victory over the Saints

first_img“Jimmy G. had a nice afternoon, 349 yards passing,” Stephen A. said. “It was … If video from ESPN’s “First Take” can be taken at face value, Stephen A. Smith actually said a couple nice things about 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo in the wake of the 49ers’ 48-46 victory over the New Orleans Saints.CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the video on a mobile deviceTook it like a man, they said. Bravely waived off the general anesthetic and settled for sedation, they said.last_img read more

South African market hungry for the Joule

first_imgJoules will go on sale in 2013.(Image: Optimal Energy)MEDIA CONTACTS• Jaco van LoggerenbergMedia LiaisonOptimal Energy+27 21 462 7804 or +27 82 903 7947RELATED ARTICLES• Model ‘green’ car in SA for World Cup• Mercedes-Benz SA tops for quality• Electrifying SA’s motor industry• VW SA wins multibillion contractBongani NkosiThe South African market looks ready to buy into the Joule, the country’s first stylish electric car.Although it will only be mass-produced late in 2012 and go on sale in 2013, there’s already a considerable demand for it, said Jaco van Loggerenberg, spokesperson for the car’s developer, Optimal Energy.“Demand in South Africa is there and it will grow,” he said. “We get phone calls from customers everyday, people are asking where they can buy the Joule.”The South African Department of Science and Technology and state-owned Industrial Development Corporation have invested heavily in Optimal Energy to get the project off the ground.Optimal Energy is a private South African company based in Cape Town.South Africa is proving to be one of the markets willing to embrace eco-friendly electrical cars, according to Van Loggerenberg. “You can see that readiness in many countries is growing. You see a level of readiness even in South Africa.”Most potential buyers have indicated they are concerned about conventional vehicles’ impact on the environment. “People want the electric car because it has fewer emissions,” said Van Loggerenberg.Export plans The outlook is that Joule sales will surge in the UK and other European countries, where there’s already strong demand for electric vehicles.Optimal Energy is planning to produce between 30 000 and 50 000 Joule units per year from 2013. “A lot of these cars would go to Europe, looking at the readiness of those countries,” Van Loggerenberg said.“The South African market is important to us,” he added, “we’ll sell many cars in South Africa, as much as the market can absorb”.Optimal Energy is hoping that the South African government will give incentives to electric car buyers, as is already done in countries like UK, the US, Japan, France and Spain.Chic, high-speed vehicleThe Joule, launched at the Paris Motor Show in 2008, is a trendy four-wheel vehicle with a top speed of 135km/h, enabling it to drive on highways. The five-seater zero carbon-emission car is powered by a lithium-ion battery which, if charged overnight, could last for about 300km.But experts say the Joule is more suitable for urban motorists, who drive about 150km a day.The batteries are currently produced by South Korea’s Energy Innovation Group, but there are plans to manufacture them in South Africa closer to production time, Van Loggerenberg said.The Joule also has an additional solar panel fitted on its rooftop to power accessories like the air-conditioner and electric windows.The vehicle, designed by South African-born Keith Helfet, a former top designer at Jaguar, will sell for between R235 000 and R285 000 (US$31 000 and $37 700).Creating jobsAll Joule cars will be manufactured in South Africa, with the production plant certain to be set up in Port Elizabeth or East London in the Eastern Cape province.The project is expected to create between 8 000 and 10 000 jobs for locals, “which will be of great benefit to South Africa”, Van Loggerenberg said.A limited number of Joule cars will be released onto the South African market later in 2010 to test the public’s interest. “We want to gauge feedback from customers and the media,” said Van Loggerenberg.last_img read more

The Impact, Profile, and Reputation of South Africa on the African Continent

first_imgEY Africa Attractiveness Survey 2015SA is the top destination for FDI projects – the country attracted 121 projects in 2014/15SA was the favourite destination for Chinese projects, securing 34.4% of total Chinese investment on the African continentNorth Africa rebounds as inflows to Southern Africa falter: Egypt comes second with 71 projects; Morocco comes third with 67 projectsThe above are actual greenfields investments, and does not account for flows in the financial markets – which – if included will show that SA is the top destination for FDI and financial market activity in AfricaContext: Africa’s share of global FDI grew from 3.6% in 2003 to 7,7 in 2012, and the continent more than doubled its share of global FDI flows from 7.8% in 2013 to 17.1% in 2014Global FDI flow indicators on SA: OutboundEY – Africa Attractiveness Survey (2015)South Africa is the second largest source of FDI into the African continent (53 projects launched in 2014).SA is the leading intra-regional investor in the financial services sector (16 projects launched in 2014.Outbound Investment2013 budget speech of then minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, indicated that during the 2008-2013 period the South African Reserve Bank approved nearly 1000 large investments by South African corporations into 36 African countriesNDP underlines critical importance of boosting intra-African trade and integration of regional marketsJohannesburg Stock Exchange currently ranked the 19th largest stock exchange in the world by market capitalisation and the largest exchange in AfricaIndustrial Development Corporation (IDC) has investments in 60 projects across 20 countries that creates a cumulative African investment portfolio of R7.5 billion by March 2014With so many SA and multinational corporates that operate from Joburg into other African markets, the city’s logistical, air, inland port, and related soft infrastructure provides a solid base for corporates to establish regional headquarters.Brand SA Fieldwork ResearchTHE SA INC SERIESRationale:SA’s reputation is shaped by foreign policy; trade interactions as well as a divergent sets of relationships & interests (governmental, non-governmental, and business)Objectives:Development of framework of analysis that considers all elements of SA’s strategic economic, diplomatic, multilateral, and peace & security engagements on the continentIntegrated view of SA’s footprint on the continent for strategic marketing, communications, and reputation management projectsThe SA Inc. Project: FieldworkCycle 1 – 2014/15: Kenya, Nigeria, GhanaCycle 2 – 2015/16: Russia, Angola, DRC, SenegalBrand SA’s Africa strategy: development of SA presence & reputation in select markets/multilateral environmentsSouth Africa In(c) series research reports based on:direct fieldwork studiesdesktop researchSA Inc. Project: Kenya – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Kenya Imports from SA: R 7 778 157 829SA Imports from Kenya: R 214 882 875Total Bilateral Trade: R7 993 040 704SA Inc. Project: Kenya Key FindingsChallenges & opportunities for interaction between the countries:SA’s reputational strengths:SA democratic transition, strong institutionsMajor interest in SA music & cultureSA’s reputational challenges:SA seen as losing competitive edge, & not promoting internal developmentSA character/personality perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA companies losing to local competition due to poor market entry strategies and ‘know it all’ attitudesSA Inc. Project: Nigeria – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Nigeria Imports from SA: R 7 524 647 002SA Imports from Nigeria: R 35 016 713 902Total Bilateral Trade: R 42 541 360 904SA Inc. Project: Nigeria Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA highly visible & respected (more than 150 companies active in market)SA’s democratic transition, institutional & infrastructural profile appreciated & referenced as key attractiveness featureInterest in business & investment interactions as well as cultural, music, tourism & related experiencesSA’s reputational challenges:Despite major business & investment footprint, concerns about SA character & business cultureWith Nigeria’s rebased GDP, SA considered to be losing competitive edgeSA character/business persona can be perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA co’s losing to local competition due to quick adaptation & learning and not woking with local partners in market entry, maintenance & expansion strategiesSA Inc. Project: Ghana– South Africa Bilateral TradeGhana Imports from SA: R 4 102 457 867SA Imports from Ghana: R 175 234 249Total Bilateral Trade: R4 277 692 116SA Inc. Project: Ghana Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA’s corporate governance, managerial, technical, & other expertiseStrong people-to-people relations & potential for expansion in creative spheres, e.g. design, music, visual artsSA corporates & their products & services widely known & utilised in marketGhanaians prefer ‘international brands’, incl. those from SAPotential in building deeper social & cultural relations via music, arts, design and cultural diplomacySA entrepreneurs use Accra as regional base/hub for West African business operationsSA Inc. Project: Angola– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Angola Imports from SA: R 8 034 823 695SA Imports from Angola: R 15 372 088 529Total Bilateral Trade: R23 406 912 224SA Inc. Project: Angola Key FindingsSA and Angola have a ‘bi-polar’ history…Therefore critical that interested parties carefully select expats and South African experts to be deployed in the marketAngolans describe themselves as arrogant, and South Africans are also criticised as being arrogant – need for increased cultural contact and building of mutual understandingUnderstand political & administrative context and “do homework”! Invest adequate resources (time and money) in preparing to enter the marketTake time & invest in relationship-building; identify reliable local partnerRecognise importance of language and (business) culture, e.g. Portuguese South Africans play a constructive role in several SA corporates in the marketLeverage off strong bilateral political relationsApproach Angolan government with ‘what can we do for you’ rather than ‘we are great at this and will bring it to you’SA Inc. Project: DRC– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)DRC imports from SA: R 11 925 581 263SA Imports from DRC: R 1 145 732 485Total Bilateral Trade: R 13 071 313 748SA Inc. Project: DRC Key Findings‘The Congo is open for business!’ – unlike other markets, former colonial power doesn’t enjoy privileges in terms of exploiting business opportunitiesAcknowledge local business culture & need for “courting” – relationship-building is key, both with government and business, if one is reap any rewards from engaging in the market.When entering DRC, SA corporates must take caution not to be perceived as arrogant by expecting host to adapt to their ways of doing businessAgriculture is key competitive strength – SA recognised for its expertise in sector. Given that DRC only utilises ≈10% of its 80m hectares of arable land, there’s enormous potential for SA to play a role hereSouth Africa’s Lieutenant General Derrick Mbuyiselo Mgwebi, Force Commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO)“The Congo is a big country with a relatively small budget and many priorities”Great expectations, ample opportunities and overwhelming prioritiesSA to utilise well-established footprint in DRC to promote SA investmentsOnly one, albeit critical challenge:Political instability and insecurity and continued conflict in the KivusSA Inc. Project: Senegal – South Africa Bilateral TradeSenegal imports from SA: R 1 296 609 007SA Imports from Senegal: R 238 916 730Total Bilateral Trade: R1 535 525 737SA Inc. Project: Senegal Key FindingsAt political, business, art and societal level, Senegal is extremely open to the idea of increased interaction between the countriesRelatively low level of knowledge about South Africa, particularly about the country’s development post-1994;Potential for significant linkages such as the twinning of Goree Island and Robben IslandOpportunity to focus on 30 years since the 1987 meeting on Goree island between the ANC and a delegation of AfrikanersSenegal challenges SA to play more pro-active & leading role in promoting Africa’s developmentExpanded business interaction through increased contact with chambers of commerce, e.g. Dakar Chamber of CommercePotential for expanded agriculture sector interactionsAcademic contact and exchange, esp. Universite Du Sine Saloum Elhadj Ibrahima NiassThe SA Inc. Project: Key Findings 2014The Nation Brand concept & marketing strategy depends on stakeholder interactions, and challenges Brand SA to be open to changing domestic and international environmentsUnique nation brand reputational strengths: culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure, political management of democratic transitionsChallenges: South Africans perceived as imposing, aggressive, and unwilling to listen to local adviceSA business to adopt market entry strategies that pay more attention to soft factors, e.g. local business culturePolitically, SA seen as progressive, with strong institutions, & democratic credentials.Internal developmental challenges cause for concern, e.g. xenophobia, misplaced perceptions about African expats in SA (esp. Kenya & Nigeria)SA music, art & cultural products well-received & followed, with continued interest in expanded interactionThe SA Inc. Project: Russia / BRICS 2015Activities and OutputsFieldwork Russia, July 2015Research Report, The Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, published 30 September 2015Dissemination at Roundtable, 30 September 2015Theme: Deepening the relationship between Brazil, Russia, India, China and South AfricaPanellists:Prof Garth Shelton, University of WitwatersrandMs Catherine Grant-Makokera, Tutwa ConsultingCounsellor Eric Sogocio, Head of the BRICS Section, Embassy of BrazilMr Yaroslav Shishkin, Deputy Head of Economic Section, Embassy of the Russian FederationMr. Randhir Jaiswal, Consul General of India‘The Ufa declaration and its implications for the BRICS brand’Highlights:Successes of BRICS in implementing Summit decisionsImplications of increased formalisation/institutionalisation for development of BRICSDevelopment of BRICS reflects positively on global governance capability of the five member statesThe SA Inc. Project: Publications (2014-2015)A lesson for Brand SA from Nigeria – Be bold, keep it real, and make it quick – a conversation on the art of Nollywood success. 23 August 2014, Brand South AfricaResearch Note. By: Dr Petrus de KockResearching the Nation Brand – background to the concept, and initial findings from fieldwork in Kenya and Nigeria. 18 September 2014. South Africa In(c) SeriesResearch Report #1 By: Dr Petrus de KockAfrican market entry strategy – learning to listen & listening to learn. 12 December 2014. Brand South Africa Research Note #2. 2014. By: Dr Petrus de KockDeveloping an SA Inc strategy for the Nation Brand, 28 July 2015, Brand South Africa Research Report, By: Dr. Judy Smith-Höhn & Dr Petrus de KockThe Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, 30 September 2015, Brands South Africa Research Note, By: Dr. Petrus de KockSA Inc Project: Angola Fieldwork Research Report, 16 November 2015, Brand SA Fieldwork Report, By: Dr. Petrus de Kock & Dr. Judy Smith-HöhnPrepared by Brand SA ResearchContact:Dr Petrus de Kock, GM – Researchpetrusd@brandsouthafrica.comDr Judy Smith-Höhn, Research Managerjudys@brandsouthafrica.comLeigh-Gail Petersen, Researcherleigh@brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more