EPIK Selects Financial Adviser for Newcastle FSRU Project

first_imgLNG project development company EPIK has chosen Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) to serve as financial adviser for its Newcastle GasDock LNG import terminal.ANZ will provide debt and equity advisory services for EPIK’s flagship FSRU project at the Port of Newcastle in New South Wales (NSW) in the lead up to a Final Investment Decision (FID), anticipated in mid-2020.In August, the Government of New South Wales declared EPIK’s Newcastle GasDock LNG import terminal project as Critical State Significant Infrastructure (CSSI), recognizing the project for its vital role in providing long-term energy and gas security to the region.“ANZ adds tremendous financial and advisory expertise to the Newcastle GasDock project as we continue to make significant commercial and regulatory progress,” Jee Yoon, EPIK’s Managing Director, said.“We have confidence that with ANZ’s assistance we will be able to secure optimal capital resources for the project, allowing us to provide the most competitive supply to the region.”The proposed Newcastle GasDock terminal will be capable of supplying more than 80% of NSW’s current gas demand, with the potential to increase throughput as demand requires.last_img read more

Cut drink-drive limit: poll

first_imgNZ Herald 1 Jan 2013Nearly two-thirds of New Zealanders support lowering the drink-drive limit – although the Government says it won’t act until more research is carried out.A Herald-DigiPoll summer survey found 65 per cent backing for cutting the limit from 80mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood to 50mg.Research shows an average-sized adult male can consume about six alcoholic drinks in 90 minutes before hitting the current limit.The limit has been dubbed “legal drink driving” by critics, but the Government has said it will not decide on lowering it until more research is complete.It expects to receive data from the Ministry of Transport and a driver-simulation study from Waikato University next year.Yesterday, national road policing manager Superintendent Carey Griffiths said he backed a reduction.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10856835last_img read more

Sex war – France’s new revolution

first_imgNZHerald 16 November 2013Sex, politics and morality: Put the three together, and you are sure to end up with a steaming tub of trouble.This is what is happening in France, where plans to curb the sex industry by criminalising the clients of prostitutes have caused an almighty row.Feminists and Socialist ministers are punching it out with libertines, sex workers fear the change will make their lives more dangerous and some experts wonder whether the law will be workable.A bill due to come before Parliament at the end of this month will make those paying for sex liable to a fine of 1500 ($2440) and double that if they are caught again.Courts will also have the power to order those convicted to attend a “prostitution awareness programme”, similar to programmes on alcohol abuse for drunk drivers.The bill includes financial help of several hundred euros to help wean prostitutes off sex work.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=11158084last_img read more

Support lacking for depressed mums

first_imgStuff co.nz 21 October 2015Postnatal depression is going undiagnosed at an alarming rate, leaving new mums missing out on support, a Palmerston North advocate says.Mothers Matter research has found 59 per cent of new mothers had experienced a depressive episode, which could put them at risk, and 72 per cent were not assessed at all by their midwives, founder Kristina Paterson said. One hundred new mothers were surveyed for postnatal depression (PND).She is calling for more support for mothers and mandatory testing for postnatal depression.Sixty-three per cent of those mothers surveyed experienced symptoms of depression or anxiety, either during pregnancy or one week after giving birth. Only 19 per cent were diagnosed during those stages.Part of the problem was the level of support from district health boards was inconsistent, she said“What we’ve surveyed has really shown some significant gaps. We’re getting mothers coming through who are saying … ‘my GP reckons I had postnatal depression last time’, and they already have a 3 or 4 year old.”Paterson said she herself was diagnosed with PND 18 months after giving birth.http://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/73240639/support-lacking-for-depressed-mumslast_img read more

Feminists Interrupt at Auckland Pride Parade – “Stop giving kids sex hormones”

first_imgScoop 19 February 2018Family First Comment: “The physician who leads the gender transition programme at Auckland’s District Health Board, Jeannie Oliphant, says that she herself does not know what gender is. “What makes people transgender?” she says. “I don’t think we know any more than we know why I was born left-handed and my sister was born right-handed.” Young people in New Zealand cannot be making informed decisions around gender transition when the appointed experts are in the dark themselves, and this means medical experimentation and breach of medical ethics.”Well said.Feminist activists Charlie Montague and Renée Gerlich dropped a banner at the front of the Auckland Pride Parade. The banner read:STOP GIVING KIDS SEX HORMONES – PROTECT LESBIAN YOUTH“Organisations like RainbowYouth and InsideOut, as well as the Pride Parade, must stop endorsing medical experimentation, child abuse, sexist stereotyping, and the destruction of female-only and lesbian spaces,” says Gerlich, who reached out to RainbowYouth and InsideOut with an open letter in 2016.Montague adds that, “Lesbians around the world are trying to draw attention to the harm of gender identity on lesbians, and we are being silenced.”Between 2009-16, the number of women and girls in Wellington being referred to endocrinologists for medical gender transition increased twelvefold: from three to forty-one referrals. Sex hormone prescriptions are forecast to continue rising, and are not leading to decreasing suicide statistics or increased wellbeing. Studies also show that globally, disproportionate numbers of young women being medicated are lesbian.Throughout the West, children as young as three are being encouraged to undergo gender transition. The prescription of puberty blockers to children as young as ten, followed by sex hormones in adolescence is sterilising children. Children as young as six are being given genital tuckers and prosthetic dildos, and RainbowYouth in New Zealand has been distributing free breast binders in schools. These apply pressure to women’s chests in order to damage tissue and inhibit breast growth, also causing lung damage.“The New Zealand Herald reported the impacts of a course of testosterone treatment on a Northland lesbian teen in 2017,” says Gerlich. “She now recognises that she is female. Testosterone, prescribed to put her on the path of gender transition, has left her potentially infertile with a permanently lowered voice, increased body hair and worsened depression that has lead to suicide attempts. The promotion of this kind of medicalised abuse is what we are protesting at Pride.”“By distributing breast binders in schools, RainbowYouth promotes dysphoria and the mutilation of women’s bodies. It’s doublespeak for them to do this in the name of ‘Pride’.”The physician who leads the gender transition programme at Auckland’s District Health Board, Jeannie Oliphant, says that she herself does not know what gender is. “What makes people transgender?” she says. “I don’t think we know any more than we know why I was born left-handed and my sister was born right-handed.” Young people in New Zealand cannot be making informed decisions around gender transition when the appointed experts are in the dark themselves, and this means medical experimentation and breach of medical ethics.Montague says that “Gender is a system of “pink and blue” sex-based stereotyping. Without these gender stereotypes there are no “trans” children. We want to break down stereotypes so that youth can be whoever they want to be – without being medicalised for it.”http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1802/S00201/feminists-interrupt-at-auckland-pride-parade.htmlast_img read more

Statement on the proposed changes to the Misuse of Drugs Act

first_imgScoop 13 December 2018Family First Comment: “Officers apply discretion on a daily basis in dealing with a range of matters, including the possession and use of drugs. Applying this discretion increasingly includes the use of alternative resolution options including pre-charge warnings, Te Pae Oranga, and referrals to health and other support services. Our focus continues to be on targeting the organised criminal networks who supply these harmful drugs to our communities. However, the possession and use of illicit drugs remains illegal and prosecution remains an option in order to prevent harm and keep people safe.”And this is how the marijuana laws should be treated also. Keep them illegal – but adopt a smart arrest policy.But DON’T legalise marijuana.Preventing harm caused by organised crime and drugs is a key priority for Police.We know that effective prevention requires action to target supply chains, combined with health-focused support to reduce demand, addiction and improve people’s lives.The move to schedule 5F-ADB and AMB-FUBINACA as Class A will provide Police with additional powers to target the manufacturers and suppliers of synthetic drugs, who are responsible for significant harm in our communities.The proposals also ask Police to prioritise a health response over a criminal one in applying discretion when dealing with the possession or use of drugs.Guided by the Policing Act 2008, the Solicitor-General’s prosecution guidelines, and Police’s Prevention First operating model, officers apply discretion on a daily basis in dealing with a range of matters, including the possession and use of drugs.Applying this discretion increasingly includes the use of alternative resolution options including pre-charge warnings, Te Pae Oranga, and referrals to health and other support services.Our focus continues to be on targeting the organised criminal networks who supply these harmful drugs to our communities.However, the possession and use of illicit drugs remains illegal and prosecution remains an option in order to prevent harm and keep people safe.Police will work closely with partner agencies to develop clear guidance for dealing with those in possession or using drugs, as legislative details are confirmed.As this guidance is developed, Police will continue using their discretion in a way that is consistent with our Prevention First model to reduce harm, provide support to those who need it, and keep our communities safe.http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1812/S00169/statement-on-the-proposed-changes-to-the-misuse-of-drugs-act.htmlast_img read more

Why the Government is unlikely to ban LGBT ‘conversion therapy’ anytime soon

first_imgStuff co.nz 20 October 2019Family First Comment: Good decision!“The committee said it was important that people with questions about their sexuality or gender identity were able to seek advice from people such as a professional counsellor, family and friends, or members of their religious community.”Exactly.The Government has been advised to delay making a decision on whether to outlaw gay and trans “conversion therapy” due to concerns about freedom of expression.Conversion therapy is where people try to change lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) people’s sexuality or gender identity using therapy, drugs or other means.The controversial practice has been banned in the Australian state of Victoria, several countries in South America and parts of the United States.About 20,000 people have signed petitions calling for the practice to be outlawed in New Zealand.But while the Justice Select Committee, a group of MPs tasked with considering the petitions, acknowledged conversion therapy could be harmful to rainbow communities, it did not recommend an immediate ban.“We believe more work needs to be done before any decision is taken to ban it,” it said in its report.“In particular, thought must be given to how to define conversion therapy, who the ban would apply to, and how to ensure that rights relating to freedom of expression and religion were maintained.”The committee said it was important that people with questions about their sexuality or gender identity were able to seek advice from people such as a professional counsellor, family and friends, or members of their religious community.“A ban on conversion therapy should not prevent anyone from seeking or providing such advice.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/116717531/why-the-government-is-unlikely-to-ban-lgbt-conversion-therapy-anytime-soonSelect committee fails to recommend conversion therapy banNewsHub 20 October 2019https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/10/select-committee-fails-to-recommend-conversion-therapy-ban.html‘More work needs to be done’ before gay conversion therapy banned in NZ, report saysTVNZ One News 19 October 2019https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/more-work-needs-done-before-gay-conversion-therapy-banned-in-nz-report-saysKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Priests arrested in Eastbourne in child abuse inquiry

first_imgTwo retired Church of England priests have been arrested in the Eastbourne area on suspicion of sexually abusing children and young men. Canon Gordon Rideout, 73, is suspected of sexually assaulting nine young people between 1965 and 1972.Canon Gordon Rideout and Father Robert Coles were arrested separately at their homesFormer parish priest Robert Coles, 70, is suspected of sexually assaulting three young men in West Sussex in the late 1970s and mid-1980s.Detectives in East Sussex say they are not linking the cases at this stage.Arrested at homeThey emphasised there was nothing to suggest that any children were currently at risk.Sussex Police said the arrests, made at the homes of the two men, are the result of a complex and ongoing reinvestigation.Canon Rideout, a former rural dean, is suspected of abusing children in Crawley, West Sussex; Barkingside in north east London and Middle Wallop in Hampshire.The arrests follow an investigation over the past six months by a team of specialist child protection detectives from Sussex Police.It follows receipt last year by the Diocese of Chichester and Sussex Police of a confidential review by Dame Elizabeth Butler-Sloss, into historic allegations of sexual abuse by Church of England priests against young people in Sussex and elsewhere.The force said several allegations against Canon Rideout were made to police in 1972 but no criminal proceedings resulted. Another related allegation was made to police in 2001 and an arrest was made then but there was not sufficient evidence to justify criminal proceedings.One of the allegations against against Robert Coles was investigated in 1997, and an arrest was made, but there was insufficient evidence to justify criminal proceedings at that time. The other allegations have only recently emerged as a result of the current inquiry.Det Chief Insp Carwyn Hughes said: “Although they have been arrested on the same day the cases against the two men are being treated as separate inquiries at this stage.“The offences were allegedly committed at different times and in different places from each other.“There are no allegations of recent or current offending and police emphasise that there is nothing to suggest that any children are currently at risk.”BBC News Share Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img FaithInternationalLifestylePrint Priests arrested in Eastbourne in child abuse inquiry by: – March 6, 2012 25 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

Women who quit smoking ‘cut risk’

first_img Share HealthLifestyle Women who quit smoking ‘cut risk’ by: – October 29, 2012 17 Views   no discussions Women who give up smoking by the age of 30 will almost completely avoid the risks of dying early from tobacco-related diseases, according to a study of more than a million women in the UK.The results, published in the Lancet, showed lifelong smokers died a decade earlier than those who never started.But those who stopped by 30 lost, on average, a month of life and if they stopped by 40 they died a year younger.Health experts said this was not a licence for the young to smoke.The study followed the first generation of women to start smoking during the 1950s and 60s. As women started smoking on a large scale much later than men, the impact of a lifetime of cigarettes has only just been analysed for women.“What we’ve shown is that if women smoke like men, they die like men,” said lead researcher Prof Sir Richard Peto, from Oxford University.He told the BBC: “More than half of women who smoke and keep on smoking will get killed by tobacco.“Stopping works, amazingly well actually. Smoking kills, stopping works and the earlier you stop the better.”Dr Peter Mackereth: “It’s important to get the message to young people not to start smoking in the first places” Professor Peto added the crucial risk factor was “time” spent smoking, rather than amount.“If you smoke 10 cigarettes a day for 40 years it’s a lot more dangerous than smoking 20 cigarettes a day for 20 years,” he said.“Even if you smoke a few cigarettes a day then you’re twice as likely to die at middle age.” He added it was hard to measure the risk of “social smoking” a few times a week.Early death The records from 1.2 million women showed that even those who smoked fewer than 10 cigarettes a day were more likely to die sooner. Sir Richard said that it was exactly the same picture as for men.The British Lung Foundation said the prospects for long-term health were much better if people stopped smoking before they were 30, but cautioned that this was not a licence to smoke “as much as you want in your 20s”.Its chief executive, Dr Penny Woods, said: “Stopping smoking can also be difficult to do – an estimated 70% of current smokers say they want to quit, so you shouldn’t start and just assume you’ll be able to quit smoking whenever you want to.“The best thing for your health is to avoid smoking at all.”Prof Robert West, from the health behaviour research unit at University College London, said it was important to remember that smoking had more effects on the body than leading to an early death, such as ageing the skin.“Around your mid-20s your lung function peaks and then declines. For most people that’s fine – by the time you’re into your 60s and 70s it’s still good enough. But if you’ve smoked, and then stopped there is irreversible damage, which combined with age-related decline can significantly affect their quality of life.“Obviously there is an issue around smoking if they want to get pregnant because it affects fertility and then there are the dangers of smoking during and after pregnancy.”The chartered health psychologist, Dr Lisa McNally, who specialises in NHS stop smoking services, also emphasised other factors.Speaking to BBC News, she said: “There’s the danger isn’t there that people could almost take permission to continue to smoke to 30 or even to 40, but actually in my experience younger women quit smoking for other reasons other than life expectancy. “They’re more concerned about the cosmetic effects.”The Department of Health has announced that more than 268,000 people registered to take part in its “Stoptober” campaign – the UK’s first ever mass event to stop smoking.Health minister Anna Soubry said the £5.7m campaign had “exceeded expectations”, adding that smokers were “five times more likely to give up for good after 28 days”.BBC News Sharing is caring!center_img Share Share Tweetlast_img read more

Cuba to send doctors to Ebola areas

first_imgHealthInternationalLifestyleNewsPrintRegional Cuba to send doctors to Ebola areas by: – September 12, 2014 460 Views   no discussions Tweet In some affected countries there are very few doctors available to tackle the diseaseCuba is sending 165 health workers to help tackle the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, officials say.Doctors, nurses and infection control specialists will travel to Sierra Leone in October and stay for six months.The announcement comes as the World Health Organization says new cases in West Africa are increasing faster than the capacity to manage them.More than 2,400 people have died from the virus in recent months and some 4,700 people have been infected.The death toll remains highest in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.World Health Organization (WHO) officials say the number of people affected is likely to be much greater than current estimates suggest.In Liberia WHO experts say there is not a single bed left to treat patients with Ebola.But the world football association, Fifa, says it is joining forces with the United Nations to turn the country’s national stadium into a large-scale Ebola treatment unit.Dr Margaret Chan, director of the WHO, said: “If we are going to go to war with Ebola we need the resources to fight.“I am extremely grateful for the generosity of the Cuban government and these health professionals for doing their part to help us contain the worst Ebola outbreak ever known.”‘Health diplomacy’She added: “Cuba is world-famous for its ability to train outstanding doctors and nurses and for its generosity in helping fellow countries on the route to progress.”Through a global medical programme, doctors have been deployed to a range of countries, from Algeria to South Africa.And many consider this medical help to be a central part of Cuba’s international relations.One of Cuba’s most extensive efforts is an eye surgery programme in Venezuela where thousands of cataract operations have been performed.Hundreds of Cuban medical workers were sent to Haiti during the earthquake in 2010.The country also trains thousands of overseas medical students, many of whom return to their home nations to work.BBC News Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Share Sharelast_img read more