SAMB skills head warns on funding

first_imgFunding for bakery training in Scotland is “in dire straits” according to Arthur Rayer, head of skills training for the Scottish Association of Master Bakers (SAMB). It is in danger of losing all European funding.”The Scottish government has already ceased to fund anyone over 19 years old in all sectors except construction, engineering and automotive trades,” Rayer told British Baker. “In England, there is funding for initiatives such as Train to Gain, but in Scotland the government decided food training could be funded by the Scottish Rural Development Programme. However, this means only primary food producers such as growers or farmers are eligible for European Social Funding now, as opposed to those who ’process’ food such as bakers,” he said.Rayer added: “We have talked to the SNP government in power, and to civil servants who have been in place during the past Labour government, but are not hopeful that the decision will be turned around.”We have been training 800 people a year, but this year there will be a greatly reduced number.”Those in existing training will be allowed to complete their courses, he said.last_img read more

Tiger starts British Open with 3-under 69

first_imgTiger Woods of the US plays a shot off the 8th tee during the first day of the British Open Golf championship at the Royal Liverpool golf club, Hoylake, England, Thursday July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)HOYLAKE, England (AP) — Tiger Woods is back at the majors.Seems like he was never away.After a shaky start to the British Open, Woods ripped through Royal Liverpool on Thursday much like he did eight years ago, when he won the claret jug for the third time. A 30-foot birdie from the fringe of the 11th green got him going. Four more birdies in the next five holes carried Woods to a 3-under 69, leaving him just three shots behind Rory McIlroy.Not bad for a guy playing his first major of the year, who went months without being able to swing a club after back surgery.“I’m only going to get better,” Woods said. “I’m getting stronger, I’m getting faster, I’m getting more explosive. The ball is starting to travel again. And those are all positive things.”For McIlroy, it was another blistering start.The question now: Can he keep it going?McIlroy took advantage of the prime scoring conditions more than anyone, a 66 putting him in the familiar position of first-round leader. He has played the opening round in a cumulative 55-under par this year, including three 63s and a course-record 64 at last week’s Scottish Open.But McIlroy failed to win any of those events, largely because of what he calls his “second-round thing,” an acknowledged mental block that he’s struggling to overcome.His total score on Fridays — 15 over.“Maybe it’s having higher expectations going out on a Friday because you shot a low round,” said McIlroy, whose goal now is “to put those expectations aside.”Woods, who has been stuck on 14 major titles for more than six years, is just happy to be playing after March 31 surgery kept him out of the Masters and the U.S. Open.He bogeyed the first two holes on a mild, sunny day with only a hint of a breeze rippling the flags. Down the stretch, he looked more like the player who went 18 under the last time golf’s oldest major was held at this course along the Irish Sea.“I felt good about a lot of things I did out there,” said Woods, who played the back nine in 4-under 33. “Especially coming back after that start I had today, to fight myself back into the championship. I feel pretty good about it.”The conditions were a far cry from 2006, when he won on dry, fiery course that made the grass more brown than green. This time, Royal Liverpool was lush and relatively soft after intermittent rain on Wednesday.Matteo Manassero made only one bogey and also shot 33 after the turn, taking advantage of a quirk in the course which puts three par-5s in the closing nine. He birdied them all for a 67.He wasn’t the only Italian in the thick of things. Brothers Edoardo and Francesco Molinari opened with matching 68s.“I saw the leaderboard,” said Francesco, the younger of the siblings. “But it’s a tough course, so you have to focus on what you are doing rather than the others are doing — even if it’s your brother.”Also at 68 were Spain’s Sergio Garcia and a pair of Americans, Jim Furyk and Brooks Koepka. Another shot back, Woods was joined at 69 by countrymen Rickie Fowler and Jimmy Walker; Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama, Koumei Oda and Yoshinobu Tsukada; Sweden’s Robert Karlsson; and Marc Leishman of Australia.“I didn’t play fantastic, but the course is out there to make some birdies on,” said Karlsson, who teed off in the first group of the day at 6:25 a.m.Defending champion Phil Mickelson and the world’s top-ranked player, Adam Scott, had afternoon tee times.Scott got off to a strong start, following up at birdie at the fourth with an eagle on the par-5 fifth.Woods returned to action three weeks ago at Congressional, but missed the cut. It looked as though he might be headed to a similar fate when his second shot of the day settled in one of the treacherous pot bunkers, leading to bogey. At No. 2, he knocked a long putt about 6 feet past the hole, and then missed the comebacker to take his score to 2 over.Woods took advantage of the only par-5 on the front side for his first birdie. But it was that long putt at the 11th that seemed to spark his round, the first of three straight birdies. After another bogey at the 14th, set up by an errant tee shot into the hay, Woods made two more birdies.The last three Open champions have all been in their early 40s, but there were a bunch of 20-somethings — McIlroy, Manassero, Koepka, Fowler, Matsuyama — in the mix on Thursday.Koepka, a 24-year-old who began his pro career in Europe, is ready for a youth movement.“I hope someone in their 20s wins,” he said. “I hope it’s me.”___Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963last_img read more

Olympia Resident Receives Unexpected Shipment of 19,000 UNICEF Coin Boxes

first_imgFacebook91Tweet0Pin0 Pirates Cliff Rice, Burt Meyer, and Di Meyer, serenade Griffin students as they turn in UNICEF coin boxes.Olympia resident Ellen Rice received an unsettling phone call last Friday. A staff member from UNICEF called to say that an error had been made and 19,000 “Trick or Treat for UNICEF” coin collection boxes would be delivered to Rice’s house sometime this week.Rice had just finished a UNICEF coin drive for the Griffin School District. “Based on that success, I am seeing this delivery error as 19,000 opportunities to help the children of the world,” she says confidently.Rice is seeking schools, church groups, teams and others who would like a bundle of coin boxes for this week’s Halloween activities.“The coin boxes come flat, in bundles of 25. They fold up to a box about the size of an animal cracker box. I’m happy to deliver a bundle anywhere in Thurston County,” Rice explains.Michael Walther and Paxton Rice use a Coinstar machine to donate coins collected at Griffin School to UNICEF.“It’s easy to turn in the coins,” Rice reports. “Coinstar machines at Ralph’s Thriftway, Haggen’s and Fred Meyer all have a ‘Donation’ choice that is followed by button to donate the change to UNICEF.  Coinstar passes 100% of the donated coin amount on to UNICEF.  Not all Coinstar machines are set up the same, so it’s important to go to a store that has a machine set up for UNICEF donations.”Anyone wanting “Trick or Treat for UNICEF” coin collection boxes can contact Rice at 866-2468 or via email.last_img read more

Intercity Transit Wants You to get Noticed this Season

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Intercity TransitThe season’s short, wet days make pedestrians and bicyclists less visible to drivers. To help you be safe and be seen, Intercity Transit is providing free, reflective-safety lights this December when you buy your monthly pass at the Olympia Transit Center.Your safety is a top priority at Intercity Transit. Reflective clothing and lights can help make you more visible. Help ensure your safety by using:Lights:Waiting at a bus stop: Use a flashlight, light up your cell phone, or wear a flashing safety light to ensure that our drivers can see you.Bicycling: State law requires the use of a white headlamp and a red rear reflector or tail light when it’s dark.Walking or running: Wear a headlamp, carry a flashlight, or wear flashing safety lights.Flashing lights appear brighter and draw attention faster than steady lights. Add them to shoes, backpacks, coats or jacket sleeves, purse straps and anywhere else you can think of.Reflective clothing and gear:Jackets, vests, caps, gloves and more with reflective features are great options to increase your visibility.Reflective tape or bands are inexpensive options that can be added to outfits, backpacks umbrellas and more.Highly-visible umbrellas help you stand out (and keep you dry).Reflective backpack covers help keep contents dry and make you more visible.Safety lights will be available free with the purchase of a monthly bus pass at the Olympia Transit Center during December while supplies last. After December, safety lights may be purchased for $2last_img read more

Olympia Harbor Days Tugboat Races & Festival Schedule

first_imgFacebook118Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Olympia Harbor DaysOnly at Olympia Harbor Days, an Olympia Kiwanis Event this weekend August 30 – September 1,  will you find over 20 vintage tugboats of the Puget Sound for a climb aboard show Saturday and races on Sunday.  Final plans for this free and family friendly festival are headed for the finish line, making way for the 46th Annual Edition of Olympia Harbor Days Vintage Tugboat Festival and Races, South Sound’s largest maritime festival at the Olympia waterfront.  Over 55,000 are expected to attend.   The award winning event is presented by the Olympia Kiwanis Club with title sponsor the Squaxin Island Tribe.  “46 years and we keep growing – bringing new and exciting features and landside activities as well as increasing the tugboat and harbor ship participation.” says Executive Director Carol Riley.By Sea:  Tugboats and Ships of the Harbor ships of all shapes and sizes will join Tug Sand Man and start filling the docks at Percival Landing starting Thursday.  Expected are 20 tugboats which are open for dockside touring Saturday, August 31 and racing in the channel of Budd Inlet on Sunday, September 1.  One tug will also be hosting live music on deck on Saturday.  Joining the tugs will be retired Coast Guard Cutter and WWII floating museum Tug Comanche.  On Tuesday of this week the Tall Ship Lady Washington will arrive at the Port Plaza dock and is open for touring and excursion sailings.  One of the last remaining historic Mosquito Fleet ships, the Virginia V will arrive Friday with 120 passengers on board, most of whom will spend the weekend in Olympia.  The Kiwanis want to  thank Capital Heating & Cooling, the Ships of the Harbor sponsor.By Land: Kick off Friday, August 30 with a Walk-About the Harbor with the Capitol Volkssport Club.  Registration starts a 2pm at Batdorf and Bronson Tasting Room on Market Street.  Olympia Harbor Days officially opens at 5pm with a tribal blessing followed by a great show by Rich Wetzel and his Groovin Higher band and some fun circus performers nearby.  A great assortment of vendor booths line the boardwalks and Columbia Street.  Seafood lovers will enjoy the offerings of salmon, oysters, lobster, fish tacos and more at the Percival Landing Food G’Alley .  On Saturday starting at 10am find the 2-day Harbor Display built of Legos and create your own tug, train, plane or pirate ship, thanks to sponsor Heritage Bank.  Kids will love Olympia’s award winning Hands On Children’s Museum’s  Rumble Tug  make, race and take activity.  Also find remote control model tugboats and robotics displays.  The festival is offering for the first time a maritime sea school for teens.Sand at the Harbor continues its third year with a giant sand carved display created by the professional sand carvers of Form Finders.  Watch them compete in a quick carve contest Sunday at the Midway Stage near the Marinas.The Squaxin Island Tribe, title sponsor, will again offer tribal arts and cultural activities at the Port Plaza.   Come learn about the culture and tribal history of the South Sound, watch tribal carvers and shop the Native American arts booths, all weekend at the Squaxin Island Salish Seaport at the Port Plaza.  The area also hosts a beer/wine/cider garden, roasted corn and the famous Kiwanis Hot Dog Stand.A wide array of music will be found on Washington’s Lottery Main Stage and Midway Stage at Percival Landing.  Enjoy Sea Shanties, the Army’s First Corps Jazz Band, and many of Olympia’s classic rock bands.    Kids will enjoy nearby Pirates, Balloon Artists, Face Painters, Caricatures, and so much more.  There is even a Treasure Chest at the Harbor House for those kids that come to the festival dressed like a pirate.“We have enjoyed our many years at Olympia Harbor Days (OHD). We started doing OHD because our daughter lived down that way and she helped us every year. Now they have their own business so we have passed the torch.” Randy Yaple, Yaple Kettle Corn.Riley wants to thank the many community businesses and maritime partners for continued and new sponsorship to keep the tugs and ships coming to Olympia and allowing the expansion of land side offerings.  “Without the support of the community and sponsors, this festival would not have been able to become what it is today” says Riley.For a complete schedule and all festival details or for more information, please visit www.HarborDays.com.  While the festival is free, they do ask for a suggested donation of $5 per person or $10 per family.  Net proceeds and donations support Kiwanis scholarships and activities that benefit kids and their families.last_img read more