No. 3 Sam Houston State Wrangles No. 6 McNeese to Move On

first_img2018 Southland Conference Volleyball Tournament HomepageBox Score | Photo Gallery Angela McGownd was the maestro on defense for the Cowgirls providing 27 of McNeese’s 73 digs for the match. Keegen Nelms led the McNeese squad with 15 kills. The Bearkats provided 17 blocks on the afternoon, marking the most by a Sam Houston State team since the 2009 season where they recorded 20.5 against University of Texas San Antonio. Taylor Cunningham came up with 10 blocks on her own to tie her single-game career-high. Cunningham is now the fourth Bearkat in program history to provide 10 or more blocks on multiple occasions. Set OneMcNeese hammered home 17 kills from six players in their 25-23 opening-set win over Sam Houston State. Keegan Nelms led the Cowgirls with four kills on 13 swings as McNeese hit a .233 hitting average. McGownd and Alexandra Aguilera combined for 13 of the Cowgirls 18 digs. Set ThreeThe Bearkats made quick work of the Cowgirls in the third set with a 25-14 victory that was highlighted by a .341 SHSU hitting percentage. Sam Houston State commanded respect at the net with seven blocks that limited McNeese to a .106 hitting average. Cunningham and Lewis once again headlined SHSU’s offense combining for nine of the Bearkats’ 15 kills. NATCHITOCHES, Louisiana – No. 3 Sam Houston State proved too powerful for McNeese as they outlasted the No. 6 Cowgirls 3-1 (23-25, 25-20, 25-14, 26-24) in Friday’s quarterfinal matchup of the 2018 Southland Conference Tournament at Prather Coliseum in Natchitoches, La. Sam Houston State moves on to the semifinal round where they will face the winner of No. 2 Central Arkansas and No. 7 Northwestern State. Opening serve is scheduled for Saturday at 2:30 p.m. on the Southland Digital Network. Set TwoAshley Lewis and Taylor Cunningham charged the Bearkat offense as the tandem combined for eight of Sam Houston State’s 15 kills. McNeese’s McGownd attempted to divert the SHSU’s offense with nine of the Cowgirl’s 17 digs in the set. Despite McNeese’s defensive efforts, Sam Houston State improved upon their opening set to capture a .289 hitting percentage and a 25-20 win. Set FourAmanda Gooch proved to be the deciding factor for Sam Houston State recording five kills in the final set to lift the Bearkats to a 26-24 victory. Offense was level between SHSU and McNeese in the final set as each team recorded 14 kills. However, the Bearkats’ defense held strong with a trio of blocks that helped overcome the Cowgirl attack.last_img read more

11th Circuit Discusses Routine Governmental Action Prong Of The FCPAs Facilitation Payments

first_imgFebruary 2013 post highlighted the criminal appeal of Jean Rene Duperval, the alleged “foreign official” at the center of the various Haiti Teleco enforcement actions, including U.S. v. Esquenazi, the recent 11th Circuit decision concerning the “foreign official” element.In connection with the Haiti Teleco cases, Duperval was found guilty by a jury on various money laundering charges. As highlighted in the prior post, Duperval appealed his conviction to the 11th Circuit and among the issues appealed were:whether the evidence was “insufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Haiti Teleco was a government instrumentality and that Duperval was a foreign official as required to prove that a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act generated proceeds of a specified unlawful activity – a necessary predicate for the convictions on the money laundering conspiracy and substantive money laundering charges.”various due process challenges concerning the declaration of the Haitian Prime Minister; andwhether the “trial court erred in not charging the jury in accordance with Duperval’s proffered theory of defense instruction” as to whether the FCPA’s facilitation payments exception applied.Earlier this week, the 11th Circuit issues this opinion.  The opinion begins as follows.“This appeal of criminal convictions involving money laundering and foreign bribery presents issues of exposure of jurors to publicity; the sufficiency of the evidence that a telephone company was an “instrumentality” of a foreign government, 15 U.S.C. § 78dd-2(h)(2)(A); whether the administration of a multimillion dollar contract is “routine governmental action,” id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(A); whether the government interfered with a witness when it obtained a clarifying declaration from that witness; and four issues about the application of the United States Sentencing Guidelines. Jean Rene Duperval appeals both his convictions of two counts of conspiring to commit money laundering, 18 U.S.C. § 1956(h), and 19 counts of concealment of money laundering, id. § 1956(a)(1)(B)(i), and his sentence of imprisonment of 108 months followed by three years of supervised release. Duperval worked as the Director of International Affairs at Telecommunications D’Haiti, a company owned by the government of Haiti. Duperval participated in two schemes in which international companies gave him bribes in exchange for favors from Teleco. Duperval’s arguments fail. We affirm.”As relevant to “foreign official,” the 11th Circuit’s discussion of this issue in Duperval mirrors the 11th Circuit’s conclusion in U.S. v. Esquenazi.  In short, in Duperval the court stated: “[i]n Esquenazi and this appeal, the government introduced almost identical evidence about Teleco. […] As in Esquenazi, the jury could have reasonably found that Teleco was an instrumentality of Haiti.”As relevant to the “routine government action” portion of the facilitation payments exception, the 11th Circuit stated:“Duperval admitted that he received money from Cinergy and Terra, but he asserted that the money was for doing a good job in the administration of the contracts. Duperval’s counsel requested a jury instruction based on an exception to the Act for routine governmental action, id. § 78dd-2(b), but the district court denied this request.”[…]“Duperval argues that the district court erred when it refused his proffered jury instruction. Duperval requested that the district court instruct the jury on the exception to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for routine governmental action, 15 U.S.C. § 78dd-2(b). Duperval argues that he was entitled to an instruction on this defense because he introduced evidence that he was paid only for administering the contracts within their terms. But we conclude that the district court did not err when it refused Duperval’s instruction.A defendant has the right to have the jury instructed on a theory of defense only if “the proposed instruction presents a valid defense and [if] there has been some evidence adduced at trial relevant to that defense.” United States v. Ruiz, 59 F.3d 1151, 1154 (11th Cir. 1995). When we review the refusal to give an instruction for abuse of discretion, we ask whether “the requested instruction is correct, not adequately covered by the charge given, and involves a point so important that failure to give the instruction seriously impaired the party’s ability to present an effective case.” Svete, 556 F.3d at 1161 (internal quotation marks omitted). But we need not engage in this inquiry if the defendant failed to introduce evidence relevant to the jury instruction.The Act allows “any facilitating or expediting payment to a foreign official . . . the purpose of which is to expedite or to secure the performance of a routine governmental action.” 15 U.S.C. § 78dd-2(b). Routine governmental action includes actions such as “obtaining permits . . . to do business[;] . . . processing governmental papers, such as visas and work orders; providing police protection, mail pick-up and delivery, or scheduling inspections[; and] . . . providing phone service, power and water supply, loading and unloading cargo, or protecting perishable products.” Id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(A). Other actions are routine governmental action only if they are “actions of a similar nature” to those listed in the statute. Id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(A)(v). But routine governmental action “does not include . . . any action taken by a foreign official involved in the decision-making process to encourage a decision to award new business to or continue business with a particular party.” Id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(B).Duperval argues that he performed a routine governmental action when he administered the contracts, but he misunderstands this exception to the Act. As the Fifth Circuit explained, “[a] brief review of the types of routine governmental actions enumerated by Congress shows how limited Congress wanted to make the . . . exception[].” United States v. Kay, 359 F.3d 738, 750 (5th Cir. 2004). These actions are “largely non-discretionary, ministerial activities performed by mid- or low-level foreign functionaries,” id. at 751, and the payments allowed under this exception are “grease payments” to expedite the receipt of routine services, id. at 747. The administration of a multi-million dollar telecommunication contract is not an “action[] of a similar nature” to the actions enumerated in the Act. 15 U.S.C. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(A)(v). Duperval was not a low-level employee who provided a routine service; he was a high ranking official who administered international contracts. And, when Terra and Cinergy paid Duperval, their “grease payment” was not to expedite the receipt of a routine service. Duperval was not “providing phone service” as the Act uses that term, id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(A)(iv). “[P]hone service” appears along with “providing . . . power and water supply, loading and unloading cargo, or protecting perishable products.” Id. The text of the statute refers to the government providing a service to a person or business, not to the government administering contracts with companies that provide telephone service.Duperval’s interpretation also is in tension with the section of the Act that describes what is not routine governmental action, id. § 78dd-2(h)(4)(B). A party cannot pay a decision-maker to continue a contract with the government, id., but under Duperval’s interpretation, a party could circumvent this limitation by “rewarding” the decision-maker for doing a good job in administering the current contract. This interpretation, which would provide an end-run around the provisions of the Act, finds no support in the text of the Act. Duperval presented evidence that he administered multi-million dollar contracts. He failed to prove that he performed a routine governmental action. Without any evidence to support his defense, Duperval was not entitled to his requested jury instruction.”The 11th Circuit’s conclusion as to “routine governmental action,” was hardly surprising given the facts at issue in Duperval and Duperval’s argument.Nevertheless, the 11th Circuit’s discussion of facilitation payments in Duperval is believed to be the first time an appellate court has squarely  addressed this prong of the FCPA (as the Fifth Circuit’s discussion of facilitation payments in Kay was dicta).last_img read more