New Large Study: Hydroxychloroquine Saves Lives of COVID-19 Patients

first_imgHydroxychloroquine cut the death rate significantly in sick patients hospitalized with COVID-19, without heart-related side-effects, according to a new study published by Henry Ford Health System. The large study involved 25-hundred patients and found 13% of those treated with hydroxychloroquine alone died compared with 26.4% not treated with hydroxychloroquine. The study was published in the peer-reviewed International Journal of Infectious Diseases. “The findings have been highly analyzed and peer-reviewed,” said Dr. Marcus Zervos, division head of Infectious Disease for Henry Ford Health System, who co-authored the study with Henry Ford epidemiologist Samia Arshad. “We attribute our findings that differ from other studies to early treatment, and part of a combination of interventions that were done in supportive care of patients, including careful cardiac monitoring. Our dosing also differed from other studies not showing a benefit of the drug. And other studies are either not peer reviewed, have limited numbers of patients, different patient populations or other differences from our patients.”Zervos said the potential for a surge in the fall or sooner, and infections continuing worldwide, show an urgency to identifying inexpensive and effective therapies and preventions.“We’re glad to add to the scientific knowledge base on the role and how best to use therapies as we work around the world to provide insight,” he said. “Considered in the context of current studies on the use of hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19, our results suggest that the drug may have an important role to play in reducing COVID-19 mortality.”The study also found those treated with azithromycin alone or a combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin also fared slightly better than those not treated with the drugs, according to the Henry Ford data. The analysis found 22.4% of those treated only with azithromycin died, and 20.1% treated with a combination of azithromycin and hydroxychloroquine died, compared to 26.4% of patients dying who were not treated with either medication.“Our analysis shows that using hydroxychloroquine helped saves lives,” said neurosurgeon Dr. Steven Kalkanis, CEO, Henry Ford Medical Group and Senior Vice President and Chief Academic Officer of Henry Ford Health System. “As doctors and scientists, we look to the data for insight. And the data here is clear that there was benefit to using the drug as a treatment for sick, hospitalized patients.”last_img read more

Olympia Resident Receives Unexpected Shipment of 19,000 UNICEF Coin Boxes

first_imgFacebook91Tweet0Pin0 Pirates Cliff Rice, Burt Meyer, and Di Meyer, serenade Griffin students as they turn in UNICEF coin boxes.Olympia resident Ellen Rice received an unsettling phone call last Friday. A staff member from UNICEF called to say that an error had been made and 19,000 “Trick or Treat for UNICEF” coin collection boxes would be delivered to Rice’s house sometime this week.Rice had just finished a UNICEF coin drive for the Griffin School District. “Based on that success, I am seeing this delivery error as 19,000 opportunities to help the children of the world,” she says confidently.Rice is seeking schools, church groups, teams and others who would like a bundle of coin boxes for this week’s Halloween activities.“The coin boxes come flat, in bundles of 25. They fold up to a box about the size of an animal cracker box. I’m happy to deliver a bundle anywhere in Thurston County,” Rice explains.Michael Walther and Paxton Rice use a Coinstar machine to donate coins collected at Griffin School to UNICEF.“It’s easy to turn in the coins,” Rice reports. “Coinstar machines at Ralph’s Thriftway, Haggen’s and Fred Meyer all have a ‘Donation’ choice that is followed by button to donate the change to UNICEF.  Coinstar passes 100% of the donated coin amount on to UNICEF.  Not all Coinstar machines are set up the same, so it’s important to go to a store that has a machine set up for UNICEF donations.”Anyone wanting “Trick or Treat for UNICEF” coin collection boxes can contact Rice at 866-2468 or via email.last_img read more

Warriors 3 Big Things: Kevin Durant shines in Finals preview

first_imgIn what was billed as an NBA Finals preview, Kevin Durant delivered as the Warriors beat the Celtics 115-111 to earn their 10th-straight victory.Here are the biggest takeaways from the game:Durant delivers Durant finished with 33 points, nine rebounds in 39 minutes, including eight points in the fourth quarter. Unfortunately, he almost lost the game on an errant pass to Andre Iguodala with 30 seconds left but was great all night aside from the lone error.DeMarcus Cousins’ …last_img

Online learning inspires refugees

first_imgGustave Lwaba, a 47-year-old from theDRC, is working towards a diploma in liberal studies from a US university, through a distance learning programme at Dzaleka Refugee Camp in Malawi.(Image: Kristy Siegfried/Irin) A cluster of huts at Malawi’s Dzaleka Refugee Camp.(Image: IAFR) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ben Parker  Director, Irin News  +254 20 762 2147 or +254 733 860 082 RELATED ARTICLES • Educated Africans teach SA children • Online resources to help pupils • SA universities to get fast broadband • Tackling SA’s education challenges • From refugee camp to universitySource: Irin NewsSanky Kabeya, a refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), has spent half of his 24 years in Dzaleka refugee camp in central Malawi. He attended primary and secondary school in the camp but, after graduating, his dream of furthering his education seemed an impossible one.“I was just staying at home with nothing to do and I lost hope in everything,” he recalled.With only three-quarters of refugee children accessing primary education and just over a third enrolled in secondary schools, according to a recent assessment by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), higher education is generally considered a low priority and opportunities for young refugees like Kabeya are extremely limited.Recently, however, there has been a growing recognition of the benefits that higher education can bring, not just to individual refugees, but to the vast reconstruction needs of countries like Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and the DRC which will require a new generation of teachers and other professionals when peace finally comes.According to the UNHCR, there is also evidence that offering continuing education opportunities motivates more refugee children to complete primary and secondary school.An education strategy (PDF, 1.57MB) released by UNHCR in February recognised the “huge unmet demand for higher education among refugees” and made improving access one of its goals over the next five years.Although part of this approach involves doubling the current 2 000 scholarships a year available to refugees through the German government-funded DAFI programme, a key element of the strategy is to make use of internet technologies and partnerships with academic institutions to reach much larger numbers of refugees through distance learning.International Catholic NGO Jesuit Refugee Services (JRS) is pioneering this approach through a pilot project at three refugee camps, including Dzaleka, which offers small groups of refugees the opportunity to study towards a diploma in liberal studies from Regis University in Denver, Colorado at no cost.For refugees who do not meet the academic requirements, but are keen to further their education, JRS has developed several vocational courses in areas such as community health and entrepreneurship.“JRS tries to do things that other organisations aren’t doing and this was certainly identified as a gap,” said David Holdcroft, JRS’s Johannesburg-based regional director.“The suffering in camps results from frustration building over years of not being able to prepare for the future.”Paving the way for the futureNow in his second year of the three-year course, Kabeya’s feelings about the future have changed dramatically.“I’m very inspired, I’ve obtained a lot,” he told Irin. “I want to make my future bright.”At Dzaleka, which is home to 18 000 refugees, mainly from the DRC, Burundi and Rwanda, the courses are mostly done online using solar-powered computers, but the students’ Skype interactions with their professors in the US are supplemented by on-site tuition from an academic coordinator and two interns.“The need for cultural and linguistic adaptation was too great,” said programme coordinator Clotilde Giner, explaining that most of the 60 students are French speakers who have learned English through classes at the camp.Carine Nice, 22, spoke no English when she arrived at Dzaleka four years ago, but she held on to her hopes of becoming a doctor. She had been in her second year of medical school when conflict erupted in the North Kivu region of DRC where she lived and she was forced to flee with her mother and five siblings.“When I arrived, it was boring in the camp and I felt I was still young and needed to learn,” she told Irin. After taking English and computer classes, she jumped at the opportunity to enrol in the diploma programme.She is one of only eight women on the course. “According to the culture, [women think] studies are for men, and have low self-esteem,” she said.Nice is fulfilling a requirement of the programme that students transfer some of the knowledge they are gaining to other camp residents, by leading a weekly discussion group for women aimed at improving their English and their confidence to apply for the programme next year.Unlike scholarships available through the DAFI programme, the JRS programme is open to all ages and educational backgrounds.Gustave Lwaba, a 47-year-old from the DRC, gave up his job teaching at Dzaleka’s primary school to enrol in the course.Opportunities to earn an income are scarce in the camp so the decision was a difficult one, said Lwaba, who has a wife and three children.“I was hungering for tertiary education and I didn’t have that chance in my country,” he explained. “I wanted more skills to help the community or even if I can be repatriated.”If the JRS programme helps Lwaba achieve his goal of becoming a tertiary-level teacher, it could benefit not just him and his family, but a future generation of pupils in the DRC and reconstruction efforts in that country.Bringing higher education to refugees It is these broader goals that inform the thinking behind another project to bring higher education to refugees due to be launched at Dadaab camp in Kenya in the next academic year through a joint initiative between Canada’s York University and Kenya’s Kenyatta University.Like the JRS programme, it will blend online and face-to-face learning, but will give students the option of earning a four-year bachelor’s degree, or opting out after two or three years with a teaching diploma.“We’re also aiming towards something that could be accessed from anywhere so that if someone were to start the programme and then be repatriated or resettled, they could continue,” said Sarah Dryden-Peterson, a researcher at the University of Toronto, who is involved in the project. Dryden-Peterson said refugee students tend to be extremely motivated.“They’re looking for any kind of printed material they can get their hands on to learn and keep their brains active,” she told Irin. “More and more what we’re seeing is that with the opening up of telecommunications and internet access, refugees are following online courses and developing their own ways of learning by pulling things off the internet.”Distracted by poor living conditions Participants in JRS’s programme at Dzaleka need to be motivated to stick with their studies in a camp environment where poor living conditions and insufficient food can be a major distraction.In March, the World Food Programme, which supplies food aid to the camp, slashed rations for refugees by half due to a lack of funding and many of the students quietly typing at computers in the programme’s makeshift classroom were working on empty stomachs.“It’s very difficult when you eat less and have to study, and we don’t know what will happen next month,” said Nice, who juggles her studies with helping her mother at home and working as an interpreter for UNHCR and JRS.Kabeya said frequent blackouts meant he often strained his eyes studying by the light of a candle and that his friends told him he was wasting his time.“But I’m getting good grades and I’m very motivated because I have a goal.”last_img read more

WEF on Africa 2016: Digital technology in schools

first_imgWhat problems can be solved by the use of digital technology in schools? This was one of the questions discussed at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Kigali. Speakers from across the world gave their insights into how digital technology could improve learning inside and outside classrooms. Rapelang Rabana, founder of ReKindle Learning, spoke at the session “What if: all education were digital” at the 2016 World Economic Forum on Africa, held in Rwanda from 11 to 13 May. (Image: World Economic Forum on Africa)• South Africans nominated for Innovation Prize for Africa• Busting the myth that Africa doesn’t produce scientific innovators• How can digital technology boost growth in Africa?• Girls in space! Africa’s first private satellite – designed by schoolgirls• Makoko Floating School: a model of Nigerian cutting edge designMedia Club South Africa reporterTechnology should be used to add value to the teaching process in the classroom, according to Rapelang Rabana, founder of ReKindle Learning. She was speaking during the debate “What if: all education were digital” at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Kigali, Rwanda from 11 and 13 May.Other speakers on the panel were Fred Swaniker of the African Leadership Academy; Aryn Baker of Time magazine; Colin McElwee of Worldreader, which provides e-books to low-income countries; Rwanda’s minister of youth and ICT, Jean Philbert Nsengimana; and entrepreneur Temitope Ola of Koemei.Can technology replace teachers?Regarding the question of whether technology could replace teachers or the traditional way of teaching, Rabana said it was not correct to think about ousting teachers. “If you were looking at a different industry, you would ask where the biggest challenges were and then try to find the technologies to solve those problems,” she said.“We should look at what activities can benefit from technologies more,” she added. “When I say learning activities, for example, I am referring to things like discovery, research, and finding things to prepare for class. Digital tools can be affective for that.”It should also be explored as a tool to facilitate group and peer interactions, as well as debates. “We still have to make sure that we adequately learn from our peers,” Rabana said.Having digital technology in a classroom should free up the resources of teachers to do things that were more “high-touch or more complex”.Connecting people to the internetThere were different stages of solutions to give people access to the internet, Rabana said. “We often bring internet access to a central place like a school or a place of work (where people can download what they need).“They don’t need internet access at home then. You still provide an effective place offline.”Swaniker said he would like to see an internet portal like Airbnb to be developed, but for education. Airbnb connects people all over the world; is a website for people to list, find, and rent lodging anywhere on Earth.“You can have these big buildings that have things like internet access and electricity,” Swaniker explained. “There is no-one there in the evenings and on the weekends. Imagine if we created those centres where young people can come and they can all get the access to the world’s education and learning resources online.”These centres would have facilitators to help the youth.Ola said his organisation had found that people could use mobile messaging applications such as Facebook and WeChat to build education applications on these platforms. “It’s free and we can enhance access with that.“My concern is always, how do we use what we have now to solve the problems we have now.”The importance of digital technology in educationIf schools had access to the internet, they should leverage digital technology as much as possible, Swaniker said. “It allows us to do things we weren’t able to do in the past. In the olden days students would go through every month and not know how they were doing until the end of exams.“But today you can track how someone is doing, enabling us to identify those students who are struggling and those who are bored, and those who are able to work at their own pace.”Access to the internet allowed Africans to overcome the massive challenges on the continent, he added. Challenges mentioned by the panel were poverty and lack of good teachers.Worldreader had evidence that girls took more advantage of its programme than boys, McElwee said. Girls used mobile phones five to six times more often and for longer periods at a time to access education than boys, he said. “It’s not about what you and I think of education but what do they (those girls living in poverty) think.”Many girls in impoverished communities risked their and their families’ lives on daily because they went to school. “I know people on this continent indeed recognise the importance of education. For many that education is the only path out of poverty.”Watch more on the discussion here:last_img read more

What Makes a Good Life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

first_imgQuality relationships protect our bodies and our brains: This study found that individuals who were in a securely attached relationship in their 80s maintained sharper memories longer than those who were not in a relationship. Our relationships, protect our brain and maintain our brain’s cognitive functioning. Social connections are really good for us: The more social connections one has, the happier, healthier, and longer that individual will live. These connections can be with family, friends, or community. If you would like to know how to apply these lessons to your life, regardless of age, check out this TedTalk, or you can even read about the study here. Robert Waldinger is now the director of this study, which is in its second generation.ReferencesWaldinger, R. (2015, November). Robert Waldinger: What Makes a Good Life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/robert_waldinger_what_makes_a_good_life_lessons_from_the_longest_study_on_happinessThis post was written by  Caitlyn Brown of the  MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter. The quality of relationships is greater than the quantity: The number of social connections matters much less than the quality of those connections. Having poor or conflict-ridden relationships significantly impacts physical health and mental well-being. By: Caitlyn Brownpixabay[smile by bosco_lee1310, November 17, 2016. CCO]As human beings, we are often striving to reach our potential and the best version of ourselves. This can be reflected in a variety of settings: career, family, relationships, hobbies, sports, positions etc. Unfortunately, it is all too easy and common to slack in other areas of our lives as we pursue the next big thing in our lives or focus on our future only to realize, often too late, that our experiences throughout life may not have quite added up to our idea of a good life. What kind of wisdom will we pass on to our children about what it means to live a good life?This TedTalk by Robert Waldinger describes a study that began in 1938 and followed the lives of 724 men from their adolescence to their death. The Harvard Study of Adult Development is one of the longest studies of adult life which follows two groups of men: men who attended Harvard and boys in the lower socioeconomic group/disadvantaged families in Boston. Each participant was medically examined, interviewed in their homes and had their families also interviewed. Every two years, the participants would answer another set of questions about their lives, complete a face-to-face interview, and a multitude of other data submissions. The main conclusion of this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier.This study found that the impact of relationships on our happiness and health is broken down into three main lessons:last_img read more

The Business Acumen Gap

first_imgHow do we cross the chasm of knowledge, the enormous knowledge gap that exists in the sales arena? How do we help our sales people gain the knowledge necessary to have the business acumen their customers need them to have?If you’re in a leadership role or a management role, you need to understand the real disadvantage many companies face. Most sales organizations have the majority of their people working from home, meaning that they’re not rubbing up against each other, and they miss the day to day conversations that help the inexperienced learn from the experienced within your business.If that describes your company, you need to create the scenarios that will provide the opportunity for your people to gain business acumen. You need to let people without experience spend time with people who have the experience. They have to go out on calls, and, in the beginning, become mimics of the experienced people. Most good sales people start out mimicking what experienced sales people say.If you’re a new rep in a new industry, it is your responsibility to go on calls with more experienced people. Spend time with people who have experience you lack. Make a list of the questions they ask in their calls, and find out why they ask them. Write it down.When the customer says something, write that down. Then, when you leave the call, you need to interrogate the experienced rep. Ask them why they asked what they asked. Ask them what the client was trying to get at, what they were trying to get you to talk about. You need to enter every call with the mindset of “I’m here to be educated.” You will learn really fast if that is the approach you take.You also need to ask questions of your clients. Say to them “Help me understand your business.” People who care deeply about their business and what they’re doing love that question. They’re happy to teach you. They will explain everything to you because they want a partner who cares enough to learn their business. You can get smart much faster. You can bend the learning curve much more steeply in your direction and make it super fast if you go into it with that intention.Photo credit: Kathrin & Stefan Solitude via photopin (license)last_img read more

Blazers hope for another post-All-Star break revival

first_imgRead Next Center Jusuf Nurkic, who came to Portland in a trade a handful of days before the All-Star break, went on to average 15.2 points, 10.4 rebounds and 1.9 blocks in 20 games with the Blazers. Portland was 14-5 with the 7-footer in the starting lineup.Portland made the playoffs for the fourth straight season, but fell in the opening round to the Warriors.This season, Portland is in the thick of the race. Lillard leads the team with 26.1 points per game, sixth in the league, while also averaging 6.6 assists. Backcourt teammate CJ McCollum is averaging 21.7 points, and Nurkic is at 14.1 points and 8.2 rebounds.Stotts was asked just before the break whether he was happy with the team’s position.“We’ve got a lot of work ahead of us. We’ve got a lot of teams out there fighting for playoff spots,” the coach said. “It’s not about where we are. It’s about where we’re headed.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Afterward, Lillard sounded like he was taking it upon himself to improve the Blazers’ playoff position.“Each season, it’s always a few teams that fall by the wayside and we’ve just got to make sure we’re not one of them,” he said. “As a leader, I’ve got to be the guy to lead that charge.”In 2015-16, Portland was 27-27 at the All-Star break after winning eight of nine games going into it. The Blazers finished the regular season 44-38 and in fifth place in the West. They got past the Clippers in the first round of the playoffs before falling to the Warriors in the conference semifinals.Last season, Portland lost three straight games to go into the break at 23-33. Shortly thereafter, an overtime loss at Detroit put them 11 games under .500.But in March, Portland caught fire and went 13-3, best in the NBA. Lillard was named the conference’s Player of the Month, averaging 29.1 points, 4.4 rebounds, 6.0 assists and 1.4 steals in 16 games. Terry Stotts was named Coach of the Month.ADVERTISEMENT “I mean, I think that’s in the back of our minds. We know that we’re usually a better team in the second half of the season,” Portland guard Damian Lillard said. “We can’t just go into it saying, ‘All right, we’re always good at this part of the season.’ I think mentally we have to understand how close of a race it is and that we’ve got to be sharp all the way through.”Portland is 32-26 at the break, tied for sixth in the West, which is better off than it was last season at the same point.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut the Blazers are one of five teams in the West with 26 losses. The Warriors and Houston Rockets sit comfortably atop the standings with the next eight teams jostling for position.The Blazers headed into the All-Star Game with a 123-117 victory over Golden State, snapping a seven-game losing streak to the Warriors. Lillard had 44 points, his third straight game with 39 or more and the best scoring stretch of his career. His 133 points over the last three games is the best such run in franchise history. LATEST STORIES Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting FILE – In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, right, dribbles past Los Angeles Clippers forward Wesley Johnson during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles. The Trail Blazers have been known for their post-All-Star break revivals for the past two seasons. Those late-season rallies will no doubt be an ongoing theme in the congested Western Conference playoff race once Portland resumes the season on Friday, Feb. 23,2018 in Utah. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)PORTLAND, Ore. — The Trail Blazers have enjoyed post-All-Star break revivals the past two seasons.Those late-season rallies will no doubt be an ongoing theme in the congested Western Conference playoff race once Portland resumes play on Friday in Utah.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH AFP official booed out of forum Struggling Hornets fire general manager amid 24-33 season View commentslast_img read more

Postgame Show: Discussing The Oklahoma State Beatdown of Colorado

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Carson Cunningham joined Kyle Porter after the Alamo Bowl to discuss James Washington, Mason Rudolph, that stingy Oklahoma State defense and what we can expect in 2017.Let’s talk about #okstate’s huge Alamo Bow win. https://t.co/NNT5MD7hNm— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) December 30, 2016last_img read more

Big Board: Oklahoma State’s Defensive Line Targets

first_imgOur big board series featuring some of OSU’s top targets on a position-by-position basis continues today with a look at who is floating on the radar for the Cowboys along the defensive front — both at defensive tackle and defensive end.Tyler Lacy sealed one spot of need as an edge rusher when he became one of the many who committed over the last month, and the Sachse defensive end likely won’t be the last one Joe Bob Clements hauls in before signing day.Let’s have a look at the remaining targets for now, but based on this list and how Clements has recruited in the past, I’d also keep an open mind for names to emerge on this list later in the summer and into fall. He has a knack for unearthing hidden gems under big boulders.Quarterback | Running back  | Wide Receiver | Linebacker |Israel Antwine — Defensive tackleLocal defensive tackle Israel Antwine of Millwood High School is a solid option at defensive tackle for 2018, and perhaps one of the biggest high school names still available that might be a viable option. He’s a late riser on the recruiting trail but at 6-foot-3 and 286 pounds he’s a legit target and a local area kid.The downside with Antwine is that he’s getting the full court press elsewhere. He told Pistols Firing that Texas, Ole Miss, Missouri and Memphis are currently recruiting him the hardest.Tate Wildeman — Defensive endWildeman was a bit of a wild card when OSU offered him a scholarship. The Colorado native is a 6-foot-5 edge rusher who, at the time of his OSU offer, was a relative unknown. Iowa, Arizona State, Nevada, and Nebraska have all offered since — and he’s a current Nebraska pledge.At this point with Lacy in the fold, I think OSU and Wildeman will likely cool. The 2018 class won’t be big on defensive ends, perhaps two at the most, so OSU might file this offer away for now until signing day gets closer and the staff reassesses their scholarship count. Wildeman doesn’t seem to me to be a must-get prospect — and OSU might have the luxury to be picky here.Tayland Humphrey — Defensive tackleThe self-proclaimed best defensive tackle in the country is Tayland Humphrey, a 6-foot-5, 350-pound run-stuffer who is a beast of a prospect. Humphrey, who is with Hutchinson Community College in Kansas, is originally from Klein Oak, Texas, and has been on the OSU radar for quite some time. He has offers from nearly 25 schools that includes OSU, Texas A&M, Arkansas, Louisville, Alabama, Florida State and others. Because Humphrey is a junior college prospect, he’d be an immediate plug-and-play guy in the middle where OSU has had success with a long line of junior college guys like Mote Maile, Calvin Barnett and Ofa Hautau.As a freshman last season for Hutch, Humphrey had 32 tackles, 1.5 sacks and eight tackles for loss. He’ll be done with his two-year degree in December, so he could be an early enrollee at his next destination. He will have three years to play two following the 2017 football season.Alton Robinson — Defensive endRobinson is a former Texas A&M signee who failed to qualify and is eligible to jump back up to Division for 2018. He’s a hard-hitting pass-rusher from NEO in Miami (Miam-uh) and to this point, has garnered surprisingly little interest. His offers include OSU, Colorado State and Kentucky.Robinson collected 67 tackles at NEO and 14 sacks to lead the Southwest Junior College Football Conference last season. Should he qualify, OSU might have the inside track. He’s already made an unofficial visit to Stillwater during last football season. But the cat might be out of the bag if he puts up similar production as he did as a freshman for NEO last season again as a sophomore. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more