Fulham v Wolves line-ups: Christensen plays, Wolves midfielder out

first_imgFulham boss Kit Symons named a strong, attacking side for the FA Cup third-round clash with Wolves, who are without suspended midfielder Kevin McDonald.Whites midfielder Lasse Vigen Christensen has made a quicker than expected recovery from a hamstring problem and is named in the starting line-up. Fulham:  Bettinelli; Grimmer, Hutchinson, Bodurov, Stafylidis; Parker; Christensen, Fofana; McCormack; Rodallega, Woodrow.Subs: Kiraly, Burn, Kavanagh, Roberts, Ruiz, Williams, Dembélé. Wolves:  Ikeme; Iorfa, Batth, Stearman, Doherty; Evans, Price, Henry, Edwards, Sako; Clarke.Subs: Kuszczak, Saville, Ricketts, McAlinden, Ebanks-Landell, Jacobs, Dicko.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Details of Photosynthesis Coming to Light

first_img1Amuntz, Drory and Nelson, “The structure of a plant photosystem I supercomplex at 3.4-angstrom resolution,” Nature 447, 58-63 (3 May 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05687.2Skourtis and Beratan, “Photosynthesis from the Protein’s Perspective,” Science, 4 May 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5825, pp. 703-704, doi: 10.1126/science.1142330.3The second paper also spoke of the efficient use of quantum mechanical properties of light: “The experimental data reported by Wang et al. also encourage renewed theoretical attention to the early events in photosynthesis.  Models that include quantized nuclear dynamics seem particularly important, because high-frequency quantum modes influence fast electron transfer, producing nonexponential kinetics and unusual temperature dependence.”4“Wang et al. suggest that the slow protein dynamics discussed above may help to overcome reaction barriers produced by membrane potentials or by environmental factors that perturb the photosynthetic reaction center and potentially slow down the electron-transfer rate.  Thus, protein motion could overcome reaction barriers produced by cellular factors that might otherwise perturb the electron-transfer kinetics.”Those who studied high school biology decades ago can revel in these facts about photosynthesis that are now coming to light (pardon the pun).  At the time, our teachers and professors saw light going in, and sugars coming out, but were nearly clueless about what magic was going on inside.  The black box is now opening, and we’re finding out that highly efficient molecular machines were there all along.  So that’s how it’s done!(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 New tools of science are unveiling the secrets of what was long a “black box” in biology: photosynthesis.  A paper in Nature last week1 described the structure of the plant PhotoSystem I complex (PSI) in near-atomic resolution.  Next day, a paper in Science2 described some of the protein interactions that occur when plants turn light into energy for work.  Both papers praised the exceptional efficiency of “the most efficient nano-photochemical machine in nature.”    As is common in the scientific literature, the paper in Nature used engineering language when discussing photosynthesis.  It referred to the “reaction centre” as a “light-harvesting complex” and to certain parts as “antennas.”  The authors used the root efficient eight times in the paper: for example, “This highly efficient nano-photoelectric machine is expected to interact with other proteins in a regulated and efficient manner” – there are two instances in the same sentence.  The paper ended:The complexity of PSI belies its efficiency: almost every photon absorbed by the PSI complex is used to drive electron transport.  It is remarkable that PSI exhibits a quantum yield of nearly 1 (refs 47, 48), and every captured photon is eventually trapped and results in electron translocation.  The structural information on the proteins, the cofactors and their interactions that is described in this work provides a step towards understanding how the unprecedented high quantum-yield of PSI in light capturing and electron transfer is achieved.The authors only referred to evolution once: “The two principal subunits of the reaction centre, PsaA and PsaB, share similarities in their amino acid sequences and constitute a pseudosymmetric structure that evolved from an ancient homodimeric assembly.”  Yet this was stated dogmatically without any explanation of how that could have occurred.    The paper in Science explored photosynthesis from the protein’s perspective.  The authors of this paper also spoke of the “efficient transfer of electrons across biomembranes” and the “high efficiency of the reaction (an electron is transferred for each photon absorbed)” – i.e., there is no loss or waste of input.    The authors discussed how certain protein parts physically move in response to their inputs.  These movements among the chlorophylls and other parts modulate the speed of the downstream reactions.  Rather than quote their jargon about biomechanics and biomolecular dynamics, let’s attempt an analogy that suggested itself from one of the illustrations: it’s like catching eggs dropping out of the sky into a soft, gentle net, where they can be safely transported to the kitchen.  Those who prefer the original jargon can see the footnote.4last_img read more

John Deere introduces new 5R Series Tractors and 540R Loader

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest John Deere introduces its new 5R Series Tractors that leverage existing technologies normally found in large tractors, to provide customers with unrivaled maneuverability, an easy-to-use transmission, increased visibility, loader integration, and operator comfort.A 7.4-foot wheelbase paired with a 60-degree steering angle, provides a tight turning radius of 12.1 feet. Customers working in confined areas such as barns, will be able to easily maneuver in tight areas increasing their productivity.Shifting is virtually effortless with two fully electronic transmission options, CommandQuad Manual and Command8. Using a multi-range selection, the operator can toggle from B range through D range without stopping. “Base equipment also includes AutoClutch, leveraged from our larger row-crop tractors. That means no clutching is necessary, ever. Step on the brake and the clutch automatically disengages,” says Chris Lammie, global product line planner for John Deere.Upward visibility has been improved 80 percent through the Premium Panorama cab roof, compared to a John Deere 5M Tractor with the Premium Cab. Forward visibility is 7 percent better thanks to single-piece front windshield, making it ideal for loader applications.Six halogen work lights (two front, two rear, and two side) are included as standard equipment to shine brightly and improve visibility in low-light conditions. For maximum illumination, owners can choose to replace the halogen lights with optional factory- or field-installed LED lights.An interactive display located in the right hand cornerpost, is placed out of the line of sight from the operator. “Tractor operations can be customized by the operator to best fit their preferences,” says Lammie.A high-back swivel seat features thicker cushions and wider armrests than those found on John Deere 5M Tractors. Options normally found in larger John Deere row-crop tractors also are now available for the 5R. New to the utility tractor lineup, optional cab suspension provides a more comfortable ride for long work days.The 5R can be equipped with the new John Deere 540R Loader. The loader’s automatic mast latch, single-point hydraulic connection, remote implement latch and slide-slung self-leveling links provide an integrated loader experience for the 5R Tractor operator. Removal or installation of the loader can be accomplished with a single trip out of the cab, thanks to a latch system that automatically connects the loader once contact is made between the loader boom and mounting frames, simplifying the connection process.To improve loader operation, a mechanical or electrohydraulic loader joystick option is integrated into the swivel seat. Gear-shift buttons and a joystick reverser are built into the loader joystick control. “Its simple one-handed operation lets you control loader, speed, and direction, all without letting go of the joystick,” Lammie says.For more information about the 5R Tractor and 540R Loader, contact your local John Deere dealer or visit www.JohnDeere.com/ag.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, January 15, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dry today and tomorrow. A large part of the state will see sunshine, but clouds will interact, particularly in the morning, as we saw some fog develop overnight thanks to the snowpack over most of the state. Still, today will be mostly trouble free. We can’t rule out a few flurries and lake effect clouds up near lake Michigan. Clouds will begin to increase tomorrow ahead of our next system. That system shows up Thursday. Temps will be cold enough for snow north of I-70, but we likely see mostly rain south of 70. Rain totals will up to .4” in the southern half of the state, while from I-70 northward, we can see a coating to 2 inches of snow for your Thursday. We catch a break in the action for Friday, with no new precipitation through the day. A strong storm complex remains on track to hit this weekend. We adjusted our snow thoughts on the system yesterday to 4”-10” over 100% of the state, and we are not changing them this morning. Some models are pushing higher totals, but we think those are overdone for Ohio. Others are not aggressive enough with the system. So, we are going to stay the course with our thoughts for the time being. The system is going to hit us…the exact track is what we are looking to hone in on. Also, over the weekend we will see stronger winds, meaning we have to look for some blowing and drifting for the event. We still have a concern about some rain or ice mixing in over southern Ohio, but as we go through the day Saturday into Sunday morning, colder air blasting in will eventually move all precipitation fully to snow. The map at right is an updated look at snow potential from 7 am Saturday to 7 am Sunday – just remember that we currently think that the 12-16 inch totals are likely to high. Our thoughts may change closer to the event, but right now we are not hyping that up, so view the map with that in mind. Significantly colder air comes in behind the system on Sunday, and will trigger additional light snow and flurries for Sunday afternoon. We can see an additional coating to 2 inches of snow near Lake Erie the lake effect snow machine starts to crank up. The rest of the state will see only minor accumulations from any flurry activity in the afternoon. Dry Monday and Tuesday, and very cold. We have heard of some other outlets that are touting minus 30-degree temps early next week for overnight lows. This is way overdone, and is pure sensationalism. We see some -10 to -15-degree lows Monday night, but nothing anywhere near minus 30. In fact, ND has only seen temps like that 1 time so far this year. It will be very cold for the first part of next week, but we are not going to feed you anything dramatic like that to gain headlines. A midweek system next week comes as cold air stays. So, we think we can pick up snow next Wednesday. Overall, it looks to be a 2”-6” event, but we are going to try and divide it north vs. south. From I-70 northward, we can see 2”-3” of snow, while 3-6” totals are likely from there southward. Another leg of cold air shows up for the extended 11-16 day period, and it will allow plenty of additional snow to develop. We will be dry for next Thursday, but on Friday the 25th we can see a coating to 3 inches of snow from a nice organized frontal boundary. Additional snows are likely for the 26th and 27th with minor accumulations, and then a strong storm at the end of the month on the 30th brings potential for 3-6”. The second half of January is going to be very cold and very active…just like we have been talking since the turn of the new year.last_img read more

Quiz für Geocache-Verstecker

first_imgShare with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedAn alle derzeitigen und künftigen Geocache-Owner: Das hier ist für EuchDecember 1, 2014In “Deutsch”You’ve hidden your first geocache, now what?April 13, 2015In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Present and Future Geocache Hiders, This Quiz is For YouDecember 1, 2014In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”last_img

Using Fax Machines to Route-Around Internet Censorship in Libya

first_imgTags:#cloud#security Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Operation Libya White Fax sends single page faxes packed with dial-up info. Here’s a PDF copy of the fax.Although I applaud efforts to curtail censorship, I can’t help but think about Vinay Gupta’s recent post “Reserving judgement about other people’s revolutions.” Gupta writes, “This is not safe territory. It is not an armchair sport. Please respect the lives of all involved.”The people behind Haystack created it with the best intentions, but may have done more harm than good. I can only encourage those getting involved in this sort of international cyber-activism think through what they’re doing, and try to understand the consequences for the people receiving their help. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting klint finley A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… As we’ve reported, Libya is facing an Internet crack-down similar to the one faced in Egypt earlier this month. As the organization did for Egyptians, French Data Network is offering free dial-up Internet for Libyans. But, if the Internet is offline, how are Libyans supposed to learn how to connect to the Internet? It turns out landlines are still up, so one group is using faxes to pipe information into the country.last_img read more

Significant Decline in Fertility Rate

first_imgActing Executive Director of the National Family Planning Board (NFPB), Dr. Sharlene Jarrett, says there has been a significant decline in the country’s fertility rate, due in part to the agency’s efforts to ensure that all Jamaicans have adequate access to family planning services. Citing the 2008 reproductive health survey conducted by the Board, Dr. Jarrett pointed out that in the early 1970s, “we averaged 4.5 children born to women between ages 15 and 49 and we see where in 2008, it was 2.4 and this is just a little above the ideal replacement level.” The Acting Executive Director was speaking at the launch of the 2012 State of the World Population Report, at the Comprehensive Clinic in Kingston on November 14. Noting that the reduction in the birth rate is a major accomplishment for Jamaica, Dr. Jarrett contended that “some of this success is due to the availability of services that the Family Planning Board has been able to co-ordinate.” According to the survey, women said they had access to family planning services at Government clinics, with 41 per cent saying they could access family planning services at any (of them). Dr. Jarrett said the decline also directly resulted from the decrease in adolescent birth rates, which was 137 per 1,000 in 1975, and was almost halved to 72 per 1,000 in 2008. “The decline in the fertility rate was primarily influenced by the younger age group. We are seeing a significant decline in the rate in the youngest age group. Between 1983 and 2008, the fertility rate declined by 41 per cent in the 15 to 19 year olds; for 20 to 24, we saw a 35 per cent decline; and for 25 to 29 we saw a 39 per cent decline,” she noted. Turning to other findings, Dr. Jarrett revealed that contraceptive use by women in unions has increased significantly over the years, moving from 66 per cent of women in 1997 to 72 per cent in 2008. She noted as well, that an increase has been seen in the number and types and contraceptives that are being used; one in two pregnancies are now planned; and Jamaica has a low average adult population. The Acting Executive Director said that despite the achievements, the Board is still grappling with a number of challenges, including the fact that family planning is primarily linked to females, where it is seen as a female issue and not a concern for males. Dr. Jarrett said the agency is working to find ways of reaching the males with the message of family planning and reminding them of the important role they play in this process. Titled: ‘By Choice, Not By Chance. Family Planning, Human Rights and Development’, the report, which was launched in Jamaica by the Planning Institute of Jamaica in collaboration with the NFPB and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPB), explains why family planning is a fundamental human right. It examines the challenges inensuring that all women, men and young people are able to exercise that right and suggests actions that governments and international organisations can take to give everyone the power and the means to decide freely and responsibly how many children to have and when to have them.last_img read more