The Skiff: Feb. 6, 2020

first_imgThe Skiff: Digital IssuesThe Skiff: Feb. 6, 2020By Drew Mitchell – February 6, 2020 121 Facebook printVolume 118, Issue 16: TCU community protests racism on campusAlso: Mistreated Honors students comes forward about trip to Washington D.C. and women’s basketball defeats Kansas StateFailed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info A fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ReddIt Drew Mitchell ReddIt Linkedin Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ The Office of Religious & Spiritual Life to host eighth annual Crossroads Lecture Twittercenter_img Drew Mitchell is a Journalism major with an African American Studies Minor from Arlington, Texas. He has worked on staff for TCU 360 since his freshman year and is currently the Executive Editor of the Skiff, where they design and print a weekly paper for the TCU community. + posts Linkedin Previous articleNews Now 2/5/20Next articleHoroscope: February 6, 2020 Drew Mitchell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Landing zones to remain on campus for spring semester Twitter TCU receives 100 more COVID-19 vaccines Facebook Drew Mitchellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/drew-mitchell/ Timeka Gordon influences America’s future leaders Life in Fort Worthlast_img read more

DS5: COVID-19’s Impact on Migration Patterns

first_img July 10, 2020 21,562 Views The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Coronavirus 2020-07-10 Mike Albanese Sign up for DS News Daily About Author: Mike Albanese  Print This Post Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Home / Daily Dose / DS5: COVID-19’s Impact on Migration Patternscenter_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago DS5: COVID-19’s Impact on Migration Patterns Previous: Benefits of Updates to CWCOT Program Next: The Week Ahead: Financial Service’s Hearing on CARES Act Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Mike Albanese is a reporter for DS News and MReport. He is a University of Alabama graduate with a degree in journalism and a minor in communications. He has worked for publications—both print and online—covering numerous beats. A Connecticut native, Albanese currently resides in Lewisville. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The latest episode of DS5: Inside the Industry features Ed Pinto, Director, Senior Fellow, the AEI Housing Center.Pinto discusses with DS5 the impact COVID-19 has had on homeowners and the decisions they make when moving and deciding where to live.You8 can view the full video at the embed below or at the following link. Share 2Save Tagged with: Coronavirus in Daily Dose, Featured, Media, News, Webcastslast_img read more

‘Africa in Motion’

first_imgThe rhythmic sound of drums echoed through the Northwest Lab building Thursday evening (Oct. 21) as singers, dancers, and several hundred scholars and students gathered to celebrate the growth of Harvard’s Africa programs.The event, “Africa in Motion,” featured comments by Harvard President Drew Faust, who visited Botswana and South Africa last year, and who said that even though Africa-centric programs have grown rapidly in recent years, she was looking forward to seeing what’s coming. One of the great strengths of Africa programs at Harvard, she said, is that they span the University, pulling expertise from a variety of fields, departments, and schools.The event was “about what we’ve achieved, about all the places we are going. It’s also about how together we can do so much more than we can alone,” Faust said.Other speakers included Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher Jr., University Professor and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research; History Professor Caroline Elkins, director of the Harvard University Committee on African Studies; and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, chair of the Department of African and African American Studies, and Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies.“This is an exciting time at Harvard. It’s a wonderful time to study Africa and [to study] in Africa,” Higginbotham said.The celebration featured Thursday’s opening ceremonies, held at The Laboratory at Harvard, and a daylong symposium Friday of panels discussing key issues affecting the continent, including health, economics, and government. There also was a closing round table, moderated by Elkins.The opening ceremonies featured singing by Harvard’s Kuumba Singers, dancing by the Harvard College Pan-African Dance and Music Ensemble, and information tables set up around The Laboratory by various Africa-focused groups. Visitors were immediately enveloped in sounds and sights, which included a large reproduction of the continent on The Laboratory’s floor, with markers for people to sign and post thoughts about Africa.In his Thursday evening address, Gates hailed the growth of Africa-centered programs at Harvard in the 20 years since he arrived. He said that history was being made as Harvard throws its weight behind the importance of African studies.Gates and Elkins, who hosted the event, thanked Faust for her leadership on the issue, and Gates presented her with a bound volume of images of people of African descent in various places in Western culture, drawn from a photo archive at the Du Bois Institute.Harvard’s strength in Africa programs has been noted externally, with the Harvard University Committee on African Studies being named a National Resource Center for African Studies by the U.S. Department of Education, Elkins said. The designation comes with grant money for programs, student travel, and outreach.“Africa in Motion” featured a daylong symposium of panels discussing key issues affecting the continent, including health, economics, and government. There also was a closing round table, moderated by Professor Caroline Elkins (pictured).last_img read more

Back to School

first_imgWhile Georgia’s school kids are just getting into the swing of summer break, specialists with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, Georgia 4-H and the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) are preparing for August.On July 5, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) news team will share their collection of stories for the 2019 back-to-school season. Newspapers and websites across Georgia and the Southeast are welcome to use this free, research-based content throughout July and early August.The CAES news team also has a selection of large-format, free stock photography to accompany back-to-school stories, as well as connections to UGA experts who can help reporters and journalists develop their own stories.Please contact us if you or your staff writers need help finding the right source for stories about student health and development, nutrition or other back-to-school topics.  Stories covered in this year’s back to school package include:Teaching kids to fight germs — Every school year, it’s great to have a refresher on the importance of handwashing. UGA Extension FACS agent Roxie Price shares her tactics for helping kids to develop good handwashing habits.Ways to keep kids active — From homework to extracurricular activities, some kids are running out of time to play outside. Here are some tips for keeping kids active despite hectic schedules during the school year.College prep begins in middle school — Most middle school students don’t know what they want their career to be, but those middle-school years are a good time to start thinking about it. College recruiters from UGA share some “real talk” on what students need to start thinking about between their sixth- and eighth-grade years.Warren County farm-to-school — Warren County only has 562 students, but the school system is getting accolades from across the state for their robust farm-to-school program, which involves UGA Extension, 4-H and the school system. In the year since winning a Golden Radish award from Georgia Organics, the tiny school system has expanded their program, adding local beef and an orchard.Pollinator gardens as STEAM classrooms — CAES pollinator and school garden expert Becky Griffin discusses ways teachers can use pollinator gardens as a STEAM education resource.UGA Radon Education Program announces annual Radon Poster Contest — Household radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., but the hazards of this dangerous gas are still relatively unknown to many Georgia families. UGA Extension is raising awareness by asking students to make posters.Great Georgia Pollinator Census — Between August 23-24, UGA Extension will coordinate the state’s first pollinator census. Teachers, students and parents are all invited to take part in this statewide citizen science project. UGA Extension pollinator expert Becky Griffin gives helpful tips and guidance for those who want to get involved.Bedtimes can make a difference in children’s mood and ability at school — Between after-school activities, homework and other obligations, kids have a lot of competition for the time they should devote to sleep. Many kids — and adults, for that matter — don’t get enough sleep. On average, high school students need between seven and 11 hours of sleep. For younger kids, even more time is needed: 12 hours for school-age kids, 13 hours for preschoolers and close to 14 hours for toddlers.Helping kids prepare emotionally to go back — Getting ready to go back to school means more than getting some new shoes and a book bag. Human development expert Diane Bales offers tips for parents who want to help their kids build an emotional tool kit for coping with the pressures of heading back to class. Communication routines — UGA FACS human development expert Diane Bales and Georgia 4-H’s Courtney Jackson talk about building routines that foster communication between children and parents. For more news from UGA Extension and CAES, visit newswire.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

No limit to Lamar Jackson’s greatness, says Michael Vick

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.Michael Vick, a man who knows a thing or two about being a dual-threat quarterback, looks at Lamar Jackson and can’t believe NFL scouts didn’t see his greatness.Although the Ravens’ Jackson is on a record-breaking pace while establishing himself as an MVP frontrunner, Vick is still stunned teams weren’t sold on him as a quarterback coming out of Louisville. There was talk among some teams that Jackson would be a …last_img read more

Online learning inspires refugees

first_imgGustave Lwaba, a 47-year-old from theDRC, is working towards a diploma in liberal studies from a US university, through a distance learning programme at Dzaleka Refugee Camp in Malawi.(Image: Kristy Siegfried/Irin) A cluster of huts at Malawi’s Dzaleka Refugee Camp.(Image: IAFR) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ben Parker  Director, Irin News  +254 20 762 2147 or +254 733 860 082 RELATED ARTICLES • Educated Africans teach SA children • Online resources to help pupils • SA universities to get fast broadband • Tackling SA’s education challenges • From refugee camp to universitySource: Irin NewsSanky Kabeya, a refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), has spent half of his 24 years in Dzaleka refugee camp in central Malawi. He attended primary and secondary school in the camp but, after graduating, his dream of furthering his education seemed an impossible one.“I was just staying at home with nothing to do and I lost hope in everything,” he recalled.With only three-quarters of refugee children accessing primary education and just over a third enrolled in secondary schools, according to a recent assessment by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), higher education is generally considered a low priority and opportunities for young refugees like Kabeya are extremely limited.Recently, however, there has been a growing recognition of the benefits that higher education can bring, not just to individual refugees, but to the vast reconstruction needs of countries like Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and the DRC which will require a new generation of teachers and other professionals when peace finally comes.According to the UNHCR, there is also evidence that offering continuing education opportunities motivates more refugee children to complete primary and secondary school.An education strategy (PDF, 1.57MB) released by UNHCR in February recognised the “huge unmet demand for higher education among refugees” and made improving access one of its goals over the next five years.Although part of this approach involves doubling the current 2 000 scholarships a year available to refugees through the German government-funded DAFI programme, a key element of the strategy is to make use of internet technologies and partnerships with academic institutions to reach much larger numbers of refugees through distance learning.International Catholic NGO Jesuit Refugee Services (JRS) is pioneering this approach through a pilot project at three refugee camps, including Dzaleka, which offers small groups of refugees the opportunity to study towards a diploma in liberal studies from Regis University in Denver, Colorado at no cost.For refugees who do not meet the academic requirements, but are keen to further their education, JRS has developed several vocational courses in areas such as community health and entrepreneurship.“JRS tries to do things that other organisations aren’t doing and this was certainly identified as a gap,” said David Holdcroft, JRS’s Johannesburg-based regional director.“The suffering in camps results from frustration building over years of not being able to prepare for the future.”Paving the way for the futureNow in his second year of the three-year course, Kabeya’s feelings about the future have changed dramatically.“I’m very inspired, I’ve obtained a lot,” he told Irin. “I want to make my future bright.”At Dzaleka, which is home to 18 000 refugees, mainly from the DRC, Burundi and Rwanda, the courses are mostly done online using solar-powered computers, but the students’ Skype interactions with their professors in the US are supplemented by on-site tuition from an academic coordinator and two interns.“The need for cultural and linguistic adaptation was too great,” said programme coordinator Clotilde Giner, explaining that most of the 60 students are French speakers who have learned English through classes at the camp.Carine Nice, 22, spoke no English when she arrived at Dzaleka four years ago, but she held on to her hopes of becoming a doctor. She had been in her second year of medical school when conflict erupted in the North Kivu region of DRC where she lived and she was forced to flee with her mother and five siblings.“When I arrived, it was boring in the camp and I felt I was still young and needed to learn,” she told Irin. After taking English and computer classes, she jumped at the opportunity to enrol in the diploma programme.She is one of only eight women on the course. “According to the culture, [women think] studies are for men, and have low self-esteem,” she said.Nice is fulfilling a requirement of the programme that students transfer some of the knowledge they are gaining to other camp residents, by leading a weekly discussion group for women aimed at improving their English and their confidence to apply for the programme next year.Unlike scholarships available through the DAFI programme, the JRS programme is open to all ages and educational backgrounds.Gustave Lwaba, a 47-year-old from the DRC, gave up his job teaching at Dzaleka’s primary school to enrol in the course.Opportunities to earn an income are scarce in the camp so the decision was a difficult one, said Lwaba, who has a wife and three children.“I was hungering for tertiary education and I didn’t have that chance in my country,” he explained. “I wanted more skills to help the community or even if I can be repatriated.”If the JRS programme helps Lwaba achieve his goal of becoming a tertiary-level teacher, it could benefit not just him and his family, but a future generation of pupils in the DRC and reconstruction efforts in that country.Bringing higher education to refugees It is these broader goals that inform the thinking behind another project to bring higher education to refugees due to be launched at Dadaab camp in Kenya in the next academic year through a joint initiative between Canada’s York University and Kenya’s Kenyatta University.Like the JRS programme, it will blend online and face-to-face learning, but will give students the option of earning a four-year bachelor’s degree, or opting out after two or three years with a teaching diploma.“We’re also aiming towards something that could be accessed from anywhere so that if someone were to start the programme and then be repatriated or resettled, they could continue,” said Sarah Dryden-Peterson, a researcher at the University of Toronto, who is involved in the project. Dryden-Peterson said refugee students tend to be extremely motivated.“They’re looking for any kind of printed material they can get their hands on to learn and keep their brains active,” she told Irin. “More and more what we’re seeing is that with the opening up of telecommunications and internet access, refugees are following online courses and developing their own ways of learning by pulling things off the internet.”Distracted by poor living conditions Participants in JRS’s programme at Dzaleka need to be motivated to stick with their studies in a camp environment where poor living conditions and insufficient food can be a major distraction.In March, the World Food Programme, which supplies food aid to the camp, slashed rations for refugees by half due to a lack of funding and many of the students quietly typing at computers in the programme’s makeshift classroom were working on empty stomachs.“It’s very difficult when you eat less and have to study, and we don’t know what will happen next month,” said Nice, who juggles her studies with helping her mother at home and working as an interpreter for UNHCR and JRS.Kabeya said frequent blackouts meant he often strained his eyes studying by the light of a candle and that his friends told him he was wasting his time.“But I’m getting good grades and I’m very motivated because I have a goal.”last_img read more

The Impact, Profile, and Reputation of South Africa on the African Continent

first_imgEY Africa Attractiveness Survey 2015SA is the top destination for FDI projects – the country attracted 121 projects in 2014/15SA was the favourite destination for Chinese projects, securing 34.4% of total Chinese investment on the African continentNorth Africa rebounds as inflows to Southern Africa falter: Egypt comes second with 71 projects; Morocco comes third with 67 projectsThe above are actual greenfields investments, and does not account for flows in the financial markets – which – if included will show that SA is the top destination for FDI and financial market activity in AfricaContext: Africa’s share of global FDI grew from 3.6% in 2003 to 7,7 in 2012, and the continent more than doubled its share of global FDI flows from 7.8% in 2013 to 17.1% in 2014Global FDI flow indicators on SA: OutboundEY – Africa Attractiveness Survey (2015)South Africa is the second largest source of FDI into the African continent (53 projects launched in 2014).SA is the leading intra-regional investor in the financial services sector (16 projects launched in 2014.Outbound Investment2013 budget speech of then minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, indicated that during the 2008-2013 period the South African Reserve Bank approved nearly 1000 large investments by South African corporations into 36 African countriesNDP underlines critical importance of boosting intra-African trade and integration of regional marketsJohannesburg Stock Exchange currently ranked the 19th largest stock exchange in the world by market capitalisation and the largest exchange in AfricaIndustrial Development Corporation (IDC) has investments in 60 projects across 20 countries that creates a cumulative African investment portfolio of R7.5 billion by March 2014With so many SA and multinational corporates that operate from Joburg into other African markets, the city’s logistical, air, inland port, and related soft infrastructure provides a solid base for corporates to establish regional headquarters.Brand SA Fieldwork ResearchTHE SA INC SERIESRationale:SA’s reputation is shaped by foreign policy; trade interactions as well as a divergent sets of relationships & interests (governmental, non-governmental, and business)Objectives:Development of framework of analysis that considers all elements of SA’s strategic economic, diplomatic, multilateral, and peace & security engagements on the continentIntegrated view of SA’s footprint on the continent for strategic marketing, communications, and reputation management projectsThe SA Inc. Project: FieldworkCycle 1 – 2014/15: Kenya, Nigeria, GhanaCycle 2 – 2015/16: Russia, Angola, DRC, SenegalBrand SA’s Africa strategy: development of SA presence & reputation in select markets/multilateral environmentsSouth Africa In(c) series research reports based on:direct fieldwork studiesdesktop researchSA Inc. Project: Kenya – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Kenya Imports from SA: R 7 778 157 829SA Imports from Kenya: R 214 882 875Total Bilateral Trade: R7 993 040 704SA Inc. Project: Kenya Key FindingsChallenges & opportunities for interaction between the countries:SA’s reputational strengths:SA democratic transition, strong institutionsMajor interest in SA music & cultureSA’s reputational challenges:SA seen as losing competitive edge, & not promoting internal developmentSA character/personality perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA companies losing to local competition due to poor market entry strategies and ‘know it all’ attitudesSA Inc. Project: Nigeria – South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Nigeria Imports from SA: R 7 524 647 002SA Imports from Nigeria: R 35 016 713 902Total Bilateral Trade: R 42 541 360 904SA Inc. Project: Nigeria Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA highly visible & respected (more than 150 companies active in market)SA’s democratic transition, institutional & infrastructural profile appreciated & referenced as key attractiveness featureInterest in business & investment interactions as well as cultural, music, tourism & related experiencesSA’s reputational challenges:Despite major business & investment footprint, concerns about SA character & business cultureWith Nigeria’s rebased GDP, SA considered to be losing competitive edgeSA character/business persona can be perceived as imposing & aggressiveSA co’s losing to local competition due to quick adaptation & learning and not woking with local partners in market entry, maintenance & expansion strategiesSA Inc. Project: Ghana– South Africa Bilateral TradeGhana Imports from SA: R 4 102 457 867SA Imports from Ghana: R 175 234 249Total Bilateral Trade: R4 277 692 116SA Inc. Project: Ghana Key FindingsSA’s reputational strengths:SA’s corporate governance, managerial, technical, & other expertiseStrong people-to-people relations & potential for expansion in creative spheres, e.g. design, music, visual artsSA corporates & their products & services widely known & utilised in marketGhanaians prefer ‘international brands’, incl. those from SAPotential in building deeper social & cultural relations via music, arts, design and cultural diplomacySA entrepreneurs use Accra as regional base/hub for West African business operationsSA Inc. Project: Angola– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)Angola Imports from SA: R 8 034 823 695SA Imports from Angola: R 15 372 088 529Total Bilateral Trade: R23 406 912 224SA Inc. Project: Angola Key FindingsSA and Angola have a ‘bi-polar’ history…Therefore critical that interested parties carefully select expats and South African experts to be deployed in the marketAngolans describe themselves as arrogant, and South Africans are also criticised as being arrogant – need for increased cultural contact and building of mutual understandingUnderstand political & administrative context and “do homework”! Invest adequate resources (time and money) in preparing to enter the marketTake time & invest in relationship-building; identify reliable local partnerRecognise importance of language and (business) culture, e.g. Portuguese South Africans play a constructive role in several SA corporates in the marketLeverage off strong bilateral political relationsApproach Angolan government with ‘what can we do for you’ rather than ‘we are great at this and will bring it to you’SA Inc. Project: DRC– South Africa Bilateral TradeTotal Bilateral Trade (2015)DRC imports from SA: R 11 925 581 263SA Imports from DRC: R 1 145 732 485Total Bilateral Trade: R 13 071 313 748SA Inc. Project: DRC Key Findings‘The Congo is open for business!’ – unlike other markets, former colonial power doesn’t enjoy privileges in terms of exploiting business opportunitiesAcknowledge local business culture & need for “courting” – relationship-building is key, both with government and business, if one is reap any rewards from engaging in the market.When entering DRC, SA corporates must take caution not to be perceived as arrogant by expecting host to adapt to their ways of doing businessAgriculture is key competitive strength – SA recognised for its expertise in sector. Given that DRC only utilises ≈10% of its 80m hectares of arable land, there’s enormous potential for SA to play a role hereSouth Africa’s Lieutenant General Derrick Mbuyiselo Mgwebi, Force Commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO)“The Congo is a big country with a relatively small budget and many priorities”Great expectations, ample opportunities and overwhelming prioritiesSA to utilise well-established footprint in DRC to promote SA investmentsOnly one, albeit critical challenge:Political instability and insecurity and continued conflict in the KivusSA Inc. Project: Senegal – South Africa Bilateral TradeSenegal imports from SA: R 1 296 609 007SA Imports from Senegal: R 238 916 730Total Bilateral Trade: R1 535 525 737SA Inc. Project: Senegal Key FindingsAt political, business, art and societal level, Senegal is extremely open to the idea of increased interaction between the countriesRelatively low level of knowledge about South Africa, particularly about the country’s development post-1994;Potential for significant linkages such as the twinning of Goree Island and Robben IslandOpportunity to focus on 30 years since the 1987 meeting on Goree island between the ANC and a delegation of AfrikanersSenegal challenges SA to play more pro-active & leading role in promoting Africa’s developmentExpanded business interaction through increased contact with chambers of commerce, e.g. Dakar Chamber of CommercePotential for expanded agriculture sector interactionsAcademic contact and exchange, esp. Universite Du Sine Saloum Elhadj Ibrahima NiassThe SA Inc. Project: Key Findings 2014The Nation Brand concept & marketing strategy depends on stakeholder interactions, and challenges Brand SA to be open to changing domestic and international environmentsUnique nation brand reputational strengths: culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure, political management of democratic transitionsChallenges: South Africans perceived as imposing, aggressive, and unwilling to listen to local adviceSA business to adopt market entry strategies that pay more attention to soft factors, e.g. local business culturePolitically, SA seen as progressive, with strong institutions, & democratic credentials.Internal developmental challenges cause for concern, e.g. xenophobia, misplaced perceptions about African expats in SA (esp. Kenya & Nigeria)SA music, art & cultural products well-received & followed, with continued interest in expanded interactionThe SA Inc. Project: Russia / BRICS 2015Activities and OutputsFieldwork Russia, July 2015Research Report, The Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, published 30 September 2015Dissemination at Roundtable, 30 September 2015Theme: Deepening the relationship between Brazil, Russia, India, China and South AfricaPanellists:Prof Garth Shelton, University of WitwatersrandMs Catherine Grant-Makokera, Tutwa ConsultingCounsellor Eric Sogocio, Head of the BRICS Section, Embassy of BrazilMr Yaroslav Shishkin, Deputy Head of Economic Section, Embassy of the Russian FederationMr. Randhir Jaiswal, Consul General of India‘The Ufa declaration and its implications for the BRICS brand’Highlights:Successes of BRICS in implementing Summit decisionsImplications of increased formalisation/institutionalisation for development of BRICSDevelopment of BRICS reflects positively on global governance capability of the five member statesThe SA Inc. Project: Publications (2014-2015)A lesson for Brand SA from Nigeria – Be bold, keep it real, and make it quick – a conversation on the art of Nollywood success. 23 August 2014, Brand South AfricaResearch Note. By: Dr Petrus de KockResearching the Nation Brand – background to the concept, and initial findings from fieldwork in Kenya and Nigeria. 18 September 2014. South Africa In(c) SeriesResearch Report #1 By: Dr Petrus de KockAfrican market entry strategy – learning to listen & listening to learn. 12 December 2014. Brand South Africa Research Note #2. 2014. By: Dr Petrus de KockDeveloping an SA Inc strategy for the Nation Brand, 28 July 2015, Brand South Africa Research Report, By: Dr. Judy Smith-Höhn & Dr Petrus de KockThe Ufa Declaration and its Implications for the BRICS Brand, 30 September 2015, Brands South Africa Research Note, By: Dr. Petrus de KockSA Inc Project: Angola Fieldwork Research Report, 16 November 2015, Brand SA Fieldwork Report, By: Dr. Petrus de Kock & Dr. Judy Smith-HöhnPrepared by Brand SA ResearchContact:Dr Petrus de Kock, GM – [email protected] Judy Smith-Höhn, Research [email protected] Petersen, [email protected]last_img read more

Freedom ‘is our common heritage’

first_img25 September 2013Telling the country’s history in an all-encompassing way shows us that the freedom we now enjoy is not “the exclusive preserve of any one social grouping but a proud heritage of all South Africans,” Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe said on Tuesday.Motlanthe was addressing a Heritage Day rally at Sisa Dukashe Stadium in Mdantsane township outside East London.The Deputy President said that South Africans marked the national holiday “with the conscious understanding that there is a great deal about our history that is bad and hurtful, yet we must accept it as part of the growing pains of the free society we set out to create in 1994; a society that is united, democratic, non-racial, non-sexist and just.”Tuesday’s occasion also marked the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Mdantsane. Home to more than 500 000 South Africans, Mdantsane is one of the oldest townships in South Africa, and was a hotbed of political activism against apartheid.Earlier in the day, Motlanthe unveiled an upgraded memorial and laid a wreath at the site of the Egerton Massacre. In 1983, communities from East London and Mdantsane had embarked on a boycott to protest an unannounced five cent increase in bus fares.The boycott culminated on 4 August in what was later called the Egerton Massacre, which claimed 11 lives, with a further 36 commuters injured. The massacre took place at Egerton Railway Station outside Mdantsane, where police officials from the apartheid bantustan of Ciskei shot and beat residents.Motlanthe said that the struggle for South Africa’s liberation was waged by “the broadest cross-section of the people of our country and was not just about political freedom, but also about social, cultural, psychological and economic freedom”.Mdantsane, he said, had to be “supported with the necessary socio-economic infrastructure to realise its full reintegration into all avenues of South African life, and not continue as a reserve for the abode of the poor, the unemployed and the disenfranchised”.The Mdantsane heritage project, like all others in South Africa, should be “inclusive of the names, languages, places, people and cultures that were manipulated and falsified to bring about divisions,” Motlanthe said.“Unity of all South Africans is a guiding principle which should never be undermined by sectarian and parochial interests.”SAinfo reporter and SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, September 6, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Rain moves in today and this kicks off a fairly wet pattern here over the next week or so. We are going just a little wetter in our forecast this morning, mostly due to the fact that scattered showers linger longer next week. But, before we get there, let’s take a look at the short-term forecast. Today and tomorrow we see scattered showers moving across the state, stretching west to east and slowly working south. Rain totals combined  are not that impressive, but will be from will be from .05”-.25” with two-day coverage at 70%. This will come as an off shoot of a cold front that has been making its way across the upper Midwest and western corn belt over the past 2 days.The remains of tropical system Gordon will move in for the weekend. On Saturday, we have rains mostly south of I-70, and coverage in that area will be only about 40%. the remains of Gordon really do not arrive here until late Saturday night and then we see our heaviest rains for Sunday and Monday. Right now we will put rain totals at 1-4″, and we still have concern about higher totals. We feel the best area for the heaviest rain totals will be in central Ohio, and northeast Ohio. The map at right shows combined rain potential from this morning through next Tuesday morning.Tuesday should be mostly dry, with only a small chance of pop up showers down near the river. However, moisture returns for the rest of the week. Scattered showers are in for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with 40-50% coverage on each individual day, and combined 3 day coverage at 70%. Rain totals for the second half of next week will be from .1″-.7″.We are dry for next Saturday through the following Monday, as we finish the 10-day window and move into the 11-16 day extended period. We are keeping our next chance of rain for the 18th and 19th (Tuesday and Wednesday), although the system looks significantly weaker this morning. We will leave half inch rain totals in the forecast for now but will lop off the upper end of the range and see how this system unfolds in the coming days. Coverage is being pulled back to 70%. Dry weather returns for the 20th and 21st, with rain likely again for the 22nd.We see temps pulling back today as the rain spreads across the state, and the weekend should see temps a bit below normal. Then for next week, we warm back up and should see temps normal to above normal. The forecast this morning is very similar to yesterday, but the addition of scattered moisture through the second half of next week gives us a wetter feel, even though we are taking some rain out of the early part of next week.last_img read more

Size Matters

first_imgThis gluttony has led some to build ridiculously large homes. If they contain recycled materials, wood-pellet boilers, triple-glazed windows, and low-flow fixtures, we call them “green.” Never mind that these homes use three or five times the resources of an average-sized home — or more.Unhelpful scoresThese McMansions are only “green” because rating programs don’t properly question their size or occupant-to-space ratios. While some programs do provide credit for smaller homes, few programs credibly and equitably penalize excessive size. To my knowledge, only the Vermont Builds Greener program has a size limit.Like the term “natural,” green is so loosely defined that it has become a favorite marketing buzzword. The ecological term “sustainable,” on the other hand, denotes a very bright line. A practice is either sustainable or it isn’t. Excess and luxury are not sustainable, and are certainly not traits we should ever tint green.Many building materials and most sources of energy are nonrenewable, and all homes damage the environment when built and operated. When homes are eventually demolished, these materials are usually down-cycled rather than truly recycled. Big empty homes need to be furnished and maintained.Most people expect green rating systems to quantify this damage. Homes with high scores should do less damage to the environment than homes with lower scores. While a green home should gain points for relatively benign materials, durability, energy efficiency, and healthier indoor air, it should also be reasonably sized.The ballooning American homeIn 1950 the average household had 3.37 members and the average new home measured 1,000 square feet. By 2000, average household size had dropped to 2.62 while the average new home had ballooned to 2,200 square feet. In fifty years, the ratio of square feet per person nearly tripled, growing from 297 to 840.There is no biological reason to justify this huge increase in living space. No other animals build shelters with so much useless, wasteful space.As Sarah Susanka points out so eloquently in her best-selling “Not So Big” series of books, building an unusually large home is a choice, not a necessity. Larger homes use more materials and energy, increasing each occupant’s ecological footprint. Even those who use greener materials and aim for energy efficiency have to admit that the least damaging home (or portion thereof) is the one that doesn’t get built at all.There is little basis for the claim that it is better to have a large house built with green materials than a small conventionally built home. Energy modeling shows that a 1,500-square-foot home with poor insulation can still use less energy than a house twice its size with good insulation.Greener materials and improved energy efficiency may lessen the impact of a large home, but those same measures also lessen the impact of an already-low-impact smaller home. However, it is the impact of the occupants, not the house, that really matters. Since small homes recognize nature’s limits by using use fewer resources per occupant, they help us approach sustainability — the real green goal.Remember, green home program administrators: homes add to our ecological footprint. Small is green; big is not.Read an opposing view RELATED ARTICLES Green Building Priority #5 – Build SmallerWhy Weatherization Isn’t EnoughWhy Single-Family Green Homes Are Slow to Catch On By Michael HorowitzHome buyers expect green scoring systems to provide guidance when choosing between green-labeled homes. These expectations are largely unfounded, however, since almost every rating system ignores or inadequately considers a major determinant of a home’s environmental impact — its size.Unchecked gluttonyUnlike other species, humans regularly use far more resources than necessary for survival. Our consumption rates are governed by fashion and personal economics, not anything resembling natural instincts. We consume at rates that nature is unable to accommodate. Our choices make us responsible for outcomes we personally abhor: species extinction, mercury contamination, strip mining, and melting polar ice caps.We act as if the limits of nature are an inconvenience rather than an absolute. We pretend nature is confined within the human experience, rather than the opposite.We naively believe that our environmental problems will be solved by technology, without any need for us to adjust our behavior. We continue to buy like there is no tomorrow, hoping others will develop green, energy-efficient materials for us. Forget “reduce, reuse, and recycle”: in our sacrosanct pursuit of happiness, we will just buy our way green.last_img read more